In this installment of our Craft Series, we’re happy to feature Feldman Architecture designers and architects that have rich creative lives outside of the studio. Their creativity inspires our professional work, and we are excited to continue sharing as they continue to create!

 

Malavika Mallik 
Describe your work – how did you select this medium?
I am a watercolor artist and I have been practicing art since the age of 10. I later went on to conduct my own art classes and present in exhibitions on local and state platforms. As a kid, I started out with sketching and basic shading using pencils and transitioned to ink and paper. This method identifies basic sciography, which is the study of shadow and light used to understand shades of colors better. I later worked more with watercolors as it allows you to take control and flow freely at the same time – the beauty of watercolor is confident strokes and the free flow of paint.

What’s your process like? What inspires you?
My biggest inspiration is mundane scenes that elicit nostalgia. My process begins with imagining a scene, and seeing if my imagination can paint that emotion. I first roughly sketch out the main elements of the painting and then start to fine-tune them before I bring out my paints. The first wash of light colors begins the work, and I finish with detailing with darker shades.

How does materiality play into your craft?
Materiality is essential for my craft – the canvas and the paintbrushes play a vital role. The sheets are much better if they are cold pressed and water washed at least once before I start painting to aid the absorption process. I like my brushes to be synthetic and smooth, and they need to be washed and dried with every use. Lastly, and most important is the watercolor/gouache paints must be truly saturated colors and not contaminated with any whitening agents.

Do you like to share your work? Do you have a website or account we can follow?
@the.tropical.tone

 

Gabby Cheung
Describe your work – how did you select this medium?
I’ve been sewing on and off for 13 years. Recently, I’ve been interested in mixing architectural elements into my wearable pieces. The side seam on these pants, for example, is inspired by wood joinery; the primary material in the backpack is construction scaffolding (recycled from an architectural installation in LA).

What’s your process like? What inspires you?
Sometimes I start with an interesting fabric, which sits in my apartment until inspiration strikes. A lot of times that inspiration comes from browsing tons of architectural details and finding patterns that interest me.

How does materiality play into your craft?
With fabric, material kind of dictates your whole piece – the way it hangs on the body is a huge consideration. I’m still learning a lot about this aspect

Do you like to share your work? Do you have a website or account we can follow?
@gabcheungg

 

Nick Polansky
Describe your work – how did you select this medium?
My work is sculpture. I like wood because every piece is unique and has an inherent story and properties.

What’s your process like? What inspires you?
Each sculpture is made from a single piece of wood. I play with the opacity, plasticity, trying to get something solid to appear transparent, and something stiff to be flexible working with the strain and stress in the grain by subtracting material in precise cuts. I use mainly manual power tools. Its a labor of patience and tolerance. I am looking forward to finding time to move up in scale. Most of the works are mockets for larger sculptures.

How does materiality play into your craft?
Wood is responsive and I am listening the whole time. Infinite lessons.

Do you like to share your work? Do you have a website or account we can follow?
http://nickpolansky.com/

 

Jess Stuenkel
Describe your work – how did you select this medium?
I started working with clay to get back to a hands-on creative process that’s specifically material and process driven. I primarily make functional ceramics; working vessels that are crafted to feel good in the hand and used daily.

What’s your process like? What inspires you?
Nothing is too precious in ceramics because there are so many points along the way for things to go awry. I lean into the process of discovery and am always trying new things, with varying results. Given the opportunity, I like to finish my work in atmospheric firings, handing over the reins to fire, soda, and the kiln gods.

How does materiality play into your craft?
Materiality is everything. It sets the boundaries to work within and to push against. I love that each piece of clay speaks of the place from which it was harvested. I work with live glazes that create an imprint of their environmental conditions in the final product. I aim to express the dialogue of these processes in the final work.

Do you like to share your work? Do you have a website or account we can follow?
@jess.faith.arts

 

Norman Wong
Describe your work – how did you select this medium?
Origami has been a hobby and interest since I was a child. My mother introduced it to me and over the years I sought out greater challenges and more complicated models.

What’s your process like? What inspires you?
I seek out origami models that at first glance, don’t seem possible to fold from a single square of paper. I’m inspired by models that are so complex that they push the limits of what is possible to fold.

How does materiality play into your craft?
Materiality in origami is crucial. The paper that I use must hold up to hundreds of folds and shaping. Paper made from mulberry tree fibers are best but I’ve used everything from flimsy tracing paper to brown paper bags in my experimentation.

Do you like to share your work? Do you have a website or account we can follow?
I like to share my work in person!