The Karoo Wilderness Center...

Karoo Wilderness Center 1

The design of the Karoo Wilderness Center, located in South Africa, has recently won the Progressive Architecture Award for its sensitivity to its site, self-reliance, and stunning design. Jess Field of Field Architecture describes, “The site demanded a solution that focused on water… and a form that speaks to it.” The design first focused on providing water, power, and waste systems that work together and support a building that lacks access to municipal utilities. The solution was also shaped by the desire to create an experience that affects the consciousness of visitors.

Aloe Ferox in Bloom

An Aloe Ferox Plant in Bloom

Field Architecture consists of Jess and his father Stan; each has strong connections to the area and hope the project will set an example of building in way that ensures the beauty of the land will last. The Karoo desert supports the greatest botanical diversity of any arid region. The Karoo Wilderness Center provides a library, dining facility and residences for leaders and visitors concerned with the conservation of natural resources. While visitors will feel the weight of the roof and its important function above them, their view will be pushed outward towards the landscape.

Section of an Aloe Plant

Many of the thriving plants in the Karoo are in the succulent family, well-known for aloe vera, which store water in swollen appearing leaves, stems or roots. The aloe ferox, similar to aloe vera and also harvested for its aloe and sap, was Field Architecture’s inspiration for the swollen roofs which gather and store rainwater. The roofs also provide temperature control for the building. During the hot day, the ceiling forms encourage air flow through each of the three pavilions while stored water provides evaporative cooling. In the evenings when heating is required, water warmed by the sun provides radiant heat. In addition, photovoltaic panels provide power and the facility processes its own waste.

The project is currently following a construction schedule that respects the fragile state of the land. Before infrastructure could be installed, aloe ferox plants were carefully relocated. The threat of unnatural erosion resulting from construction and transportation is minimized by observing the natural rain cycles.

Field Architecture was formed in 2006 and maintains an international practice out of their Palo Alto office. To learn more about their practice, visit http://fieldarchitecture.com/

Camille Cladouhos works at Feldman Architecture and is a frequent contributor to Green Architecture Notes.

WFP, Water Filtration Plant...

Photo: Pietro Savorelli

On this Earth Day, I’d like to recognize a project that focuses our attention on critical issues and is also paired with the grace of elegant design.

Photo: Pietro Savorelli

Water is one of the planet’s most vital and possibly one of the most endangered resources that life depends on.  Filtration plants come in all sizes and shapes and have various processes from heavy chemical treatment that is dumped into the oceans to biofiltration systems that can bring grey and black water up to drinking standards.  Most plants are somewhere in the middle, doing their best to eliminate the use of chemicals and to retain and reuse water locally.  One of these plants is the WFP of Sant’Erasmo Island in Venice, Italy by C+S Associati.

As part of a larger urban infrastructure and environmental upgrade plan, the WFP is located on the southeastern edge of Sant’Erasmo Island on public land.  The large programmatic elements required by the water filtration system were going to take up most of the public land on the island.  C+S decided instead to place most of that space under ground and to only house the areas that need to be accessible for

maintenance to be above ground.  The area above the buried elements could then be dedicated to the public where paths intertwine with the landscape plantings.

Photo: Pietro Savorelli

C+S’s design of the now much reduced building above ground reflects this relationship by having linear concrete walls of dyed concrete to reflect the color of the ground that seem to rise up out of its roots that are buried deep within the earth.  This is reminiscent of the Austrian batteries that inspired the architects with their utilitarian beauty.  The parallel arrangement of these heavy, linear walls speak to the cultivation of the landscape nearby where artichokes are grown.  The building, which can only be experienced from the exterior by the public, interplays with the landscape and directs views to the horizon where land meets sky.

 

 

 

Photo: Pietro Savorelli

Site Plan

Photo: Pietro Savorelli

Park Plan

Sustainable Sidebar: World Water Day Fixtures...

Happy World Water Day!   In honor of the day, we thought it might be nice to be inspired by some pretty bathroom fixtures that help us save water and keep our baths stylish!

Deck Mounted Faucets

Stylish deck mounted faucets that save water too!

01_Deck Mounted Faucets (from left to right)

Toto Soiree 1.5 gpm, HansGrohe PuraVida 1.5 gpm, Fluid Jovian 1.75 gpm, Kraus Decus 2.5 gpm

Wall Mount Faucet

Want a wall mount faucet instead? Try these!

02_Wall Mounted Faucets (from left to right)

Fluid Jovian 1.75 gpm, Kohler Oblo PuraVida 1.75 gpm, Blu Bath Works Pure 2.1 gpm

Showerheads

Let showers rain down without sacrificing the experience!

03_Showerheads (from left to right)

Toto 10″ Square Rainshower 1.75 gpm, Blu Bathworks Round Rainshower 2.0 gpm, Caroma Flow 1.5 gpm

Toilets

And for flushing down the ones and twos....

04_Toilets/Urinals (from left to right)

Caroma Cube Invisi 1.2/0.8 gpf, Blu BathWorks Halo 1.75 gpm,Caroma Cube Urinal 0.13gpf gpm, Caroma H2Zero Waterless Urinal 0 gpm

And if you want to save water with an existing faucet, or have your heart set on a really beautiful, high water usage fixture, the Water Miser is a great attachment that can help limit water use.Water Miser Install ImageWater Miser

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Heron’s Head EcoCenter...

Entrance to Heron's Head Eco-Center

Perched on a knoll at the edge of the bay, the Heron’s Head EcoCenter is a welcome beacon in the gritty, industrial landscape of Bayview/Hunters Point.  The green roof, reclaimed wood exterior siding, and restored wetlands offer clues to the native ecology of the place, and hint at innovative systems that make the project self-sufficient.  In an area where resources have been ravaged and pilfered in the last few decades, the EcoCenter has established itself as a local icon to empower the community to change its situation.

Aerial photo of Heron's Head

Heron’s Head is a small sliver of land along the edge of the bay that resembles an upside down heron’s head.  Two hundredyears ago, the area was a rich wetland estuary, the confluence of freshwater Islais and Yosemite creeks, and the salty San Francisco Bay.  Many aquatic creatures, ground rodents, mammals, insects, and birds, including blue herons called it home.

The contemporary history of the area begins with Naval shipyards, constructed in the late 19th century.  During World War II, many African Americans arrived and settled in the neighborhood to work in the shipyards.  When the shipyards ceased production, the community gradually yielded to a series of other forces.  PG&E constructed a large natural gas power plant, which prior to its closure in 2006, was the highest polluting substation in the state.  In 1952, San Francisco’s Public Utilities Commission built the Southeast Wastewater treatment station; today it processes 67 million gallons of wastewater per year in open-air

Tiles made by local youth depicting neighborhood toxins/pollution sources

aerators. EcoCenter’s site is a former landfill, and to the north is the City’s major recycling center, which brings a heavy flow of diesel trucks.  For decades, the effects of these physical structures produced an environment with high levels of airborne particulates, ground contamination, and led to abnormally high concentrations of asthma, cancer and even infant mortality in the local population.

Solar PV panels catch rays near the bay

Given the location’s history and four major surrounding forces, the EcoCenter was intended as a response to educate the localcommunity about the environmental and social effects it has left on the landscape and the neighborhood, and to demonstrate alternative solutions.

Solar PV system & onsite storage – In a response to the massive PG&E substation, the EcoCenter captures and stores electrical energy on site. Bayview is ideal for solargain, with a yearly average of 335 days of sunshine.  Onsite there is a 3.6kwh PV array and lead acid battery bank which stores 3 days of energy. All the electrical wiring inside is exposed to inform visitors of the electrical sources and pathways through the building.

Rainwater cisterns displayed prominently at the entry

View of the planted roof

Rainwater collection & storage – The roof consists of three planes, one for the solar array and two green roofs that harvest rainwater into onsite cisterns.  The rainwater is designed to flush the toilets, but the city has not yet permitted the use.  There is a ½” water line to provide potable water and supply the fire suppression system.

Stormwater treatment – Because the building does not have a direct storm sewer connection, much of the runoff collected from building and site is absorbed onsite and designed to infiltrate to the ground through low-impact development strategies such as green roofs and constructed wetlands.

The living system breaks down wastewater

Wastewater processing – Because the wastewater plant is located within smelling distance, EcoCenter wanted to demonstrate a self-sufficient strategy for processing wastewater.  The two bathroom sinks, two toilets, and a future kitchen sink do not connect to the city’s sewer system, but to a blackwater treatment loop called the Living Machine which then leaches into a constructed wetland outside. Currently, the system is designed to handle 1500 gallons of sewage/day.

Reclaimed wood siding

Recycled building materials – as a response to the local recycling center and the fact the site has been reclaimed fromlandfill, parts of the building were clad in reclaimed wood pieces to transform waste into ”new” building materials.

Literacy for Environmental Justice conceived the project 10 years ago, as a community classroom to educate neighbors about the local environmental injustices.  Around 2003, Laurie Schoeman heard about it, and felt it was an ideal demonstration project for its promise to bring environmental justice to the community and potential for non-profit organizations to take an active role in the built environment. Schoeman joined LEJ as part time staff to work on the EcoCenter, and eventually became a full time employee and primary resource for shepherding the project through the complex community, financing, regulatory and construction implementation hurdles.

Interior of classroom

Funding Because LEJ did not have an independent source of funding for the EcoCenter, a network of grants, donations and services helped realize the building.  Rights to the land were negotiated with the Bay Conservation Development Group (BCDG).  Funding was a mix of public and private resources – 10-12 private foundations grants, city funds from the San Francisco Department of the Environment, state grants by the Coastal Conservancy.  Federal money from the American Reconstruction and Recovery Act (ARRA), enabled completion of the green roof.  There were also significant material gifts and in-kind donations, including BP solar PV panels, landscaping materials, Rebuilding Together labor, and pro-bono legal assistance.

Partners The project would not have been possible without the continued support of quite a number of designers, engineers and contractors.  The list is numerous, but some of the key players included:

Toby Long, Toby Long Design, Architect

Control panel for photovoltaics

Alex Rood, Fulcrum Structural, Structural Engineering

Jeff Ludlow, Tredwell & Rollo, Geotechnical

Noadiah Eckman, Eckman Environmental, Wastewater treatment

Habitat Gardens, rainwater catchment & living systems for stormwater treatment

Greg Kennedy, Occidental Power, solar PV & battery array

Regulatory Hurdles: Many of the EcoCenter’s systems are not conventional and required significant effort to convince public officials of their efficacy and safety.  Building officials wanted to ensure safety of the SIPs and foundation system on this landfill site.  The Fire Department would not approve the project unless a dedicated municipal water source supplied the fire sprinkler systems. Environmental Health and Public Health were extremely concerned about the Living Machine systems, and the greywater usage, especially where children were concerned.

View from the Southeast

The Eco Center is now open to the public, welcoming neighbors, school groups throughout the Bay Area, and even local professionals.  When asked who she would most want to visit the EcoCenter, Laurie Schoeman expressed a desire for President Obama and Lisa Jackson, head of the EPA to see the center.  To Laurie, the center is a model for everything President Obama has stood for with respect to community building, capacity building, jobs training, reclamation of underutilized land, social and environmental justice, independent energy sources and off grid technologies.

Green Focus: Sustainable Residential...

Any architectural style or design can be green. As an architectural photographer, I am constantly inspired by my client’s applications of sustainable design concepts and materials that come together to create spaces of great beauty and comfort. Many of these projects incorporate beautiful natural lighting that does not always translate photographically without supplemental light. My goal is to represent a space that emphasizes the natural state of these projects while employing enough additional light so that no design elements are lost in translation from how it is experienced in person to its representation in the photograph.

There are no photos with those IDs or post 1429 does not have any attached images!

Johnson Residence

Architect: Tri-Tech Design, Russell Johnson

Resilient to most elements and natural disasters that can threaten a building, Russell Johnson designed his home to last for over 150 years, at which point the building can then be disassembled and recycled. This home also utilizes solar power, thermal mass to help reduce its impact on the environment.

Frame Hoskins Residence

Architect: Leger Wanaselja Architects

Contractor: Rick Anstey

Situated in Marin County the remodel of this 1940’s home included a variety of energy efficiency upgrades including a native roof garden, photovoltaic panels, salvaged and FSC wood with low and non-toxic finishes, durable stone finishes, and bamboo cabinets.

Corte Madera Remodel

Architect: Michael Heacock + Associates

Contractor: Creative Spaces

Michael Heacock designed this remodel to minimize site impact, maximize the existing footprint, recycle all possible materials from the existing building and employ a variety of additional green materials and systems.

Emily Hagopian began her career with a thesis exploring the many innovative materials and applications of green design. Over the past 7 years, she has made it a priority to document the work of design firms, organizations and agencies that are focused on sustainability.

Creative Reuse...

When I decided to reuse my Kombucha Tea bottle as vase to bring a little color to my kitchen window sill, I thought it’d be great to ask the rest of the FA staff what objects they’ve reused; below is a showcase of either quirky personal or architectural examples of reused objects that give new life to old materials. They begin to speak about how being green can happen at many different scales and be as simple to achieve as drinking your tea.  – Matt

1. Piece of weathered plywood becomes an art object
2. Salvaged teak as bath trim
3. Crushed windshield glass as roof surface
4. Wine boxes as storage bins
5. An ashtray becomes a dish sponge holder

Creative_Reuse