Staff Spotlight: Eric Willits...

 

Q: Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Irvine, California where I spent pretty much all of my time outdoors. During the summer time it was the neighborhood swim team and bike tag and during the winter time it was soccer and baseball team. I loved playing sports- and the year round sun allowed me to play as many as possible – and it’s probably the thing I miss most about home. When I got to high school, I decided to focus on soccer competitively, but I picked up surfing – I couldn’t stay out of the water completely. For 4 years, my neighbors and I spent the weekends at surf camps, and the weeknights at the neighborhood watering hole (boba joint). The only other home I had growing up was the farmhouse my mom and her siblings grew up in.  Every summer for a couple of weeks we visited the family vineyard making homemade lasagna and picking grapes, my favorite family tradition.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I moved up to the Bay Area when I started at Berkeley. I studied Economics, focused on Environmental Policy and Renewable Energy. I’ve always been super passionate about the environment and loved math- so the program ended up being the perfect fit.

Q: What was your favorite class in college?

I took a lot of amazing classes that taught me about Environmental and Energy Economics, but I was really excited to have room to take Italian as an elective.  My extended family is Italian, and I’ve always wanted to become fluent in another language.

Q: Tell me about your family.

Some of my favorite family memories are the countless road trips we took while growing up.  Every year we went skiing at Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort. My two sisters and I got very close on these long car rides.  My mom used to take us on RV trips through America’s national parks, I love how adventurous my family is when it comes to exploring new places. I was lucky enough to follow my older sister, Giortia, to Berkeley and we spent 2 years there together before she graduated and moved to San Francisco, where she now works at Lyft.  My younger sister, Helena, started her second year at CalPoly Slo where she’s studying Mechanical Engineering.

Q: What is the most interesting aspect of architecture to you?

My favorite aspect of architecture is how quickly and easily it takes you to a different time period.  No matter where I go, the thing that influences my experience the most is the architecture of my surroundings.  I can picture what society was like at the time when a building was designed, a time when people looked up at it and considered it contemporary. Working at a modern architecture firm makes me so much more aware of architecture’s evolving nature and my interest in design.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

I just passed the 2 month mark!

Q: What makes our office unique?

I think our office is unique in that everyone is so different. Our workforce has a noticeable diversity of background and thought, yet at the same time everyone clicks to form a larger identity that is Feldman Architecture.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

My favorite part about coming to work is being around so many motivated people. Everyone at Feldman is here because they love what they are doing and understand that it’s important. This group mentality is a really great environment to be in every day and is what keeps our office culture fresh.

Q: What is the last show you binge watched?

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia – one of my new favorites!

Q: Do you have any fun plans coming up?

Saving up to do some traveling!  I haven’t been, but I know my next destination is South America.

Catching up with the Client: Slot House...

“He is one of the most knowledgeable clients we have ever had” commented Steven Stept, lead architect of Slot House, a sleek modern home perched among the trees of Los Altos Hills. The clients now live there full time with their daughter, soaking up the South Bay heat, and continuing to immerse themselves in the surrounding natural beauty- as well as the burgeoning Los Altos Hills design scene.

The homeowners, now involved in tech and finance worlds, are both long time modern architecture aficionados. Hailing from Minnesota, these home tour and design savants spent weekends in their early twenties attending the Twin Cities Parade of Homes. “It’s such a wonderful event, showcasing projects of every size, as well as price points; it allowed every member of the community to tour their dream home, no matter the price” she commented.

“I would ride my bike down to construction sites near my house, park across the street, eat my lunch, and watch them build a home” he remembers of his childhood, entranced by the process of creating something from a sketch, an idea. Today, the family regularly attends home tours in the area, and has featured their own home in well-attended tours and events.

I was lucky enough to get a personal tour lead by the home owners themselves, and their loving fluff of a dog, Charlie. “The name the architects chose, Slot House, was functional, but we usually refer to our home as ‘Charlie’s Place’, so many factors brought him into consideration.” The home has an abundance of outdoor yard space for the dog to play, forty foot sliding doors that open up onto a view of the surrounding hills, and tile floors to better accommodate slippery paws and claws.

“The most important part of the process, for me, was collaboration,” said the home owners, “Working with the interior designers, the landscape architects, and FA was so easy and successful because of a shared understanding, and an ease in communication and the sharing of ideas. Everyone valued our input, and we were all equals in the process.” This collaborative mindset shines through when experiencing the home, the design is a perfect blend of the homeowners design sensibilities, one favoring modern, white, and restrained palettes, and the other carving out cozy spaces for dark blue furnishings and suede.

The home, at its core, epitomizes the clients’ life dream- to one day have a self-designed house, to open it up to their community- to share and enjoy their love of architecture, and live amongst it every day.

 

 

Summer Newsletter 2019...

Summer is here at Feldman Architecture…

and we have a collection of stunning new projects- freshly photographed! Let’s take a sneak peek at our most recent unpublished photo shoots…
Shaped by the client’s lifelong appreciation of modern architecture, the design of Slot House brings bold minimalism into the rolling landscape of Los Altos Hills. Adam Rouse’s stunning final photographs just came in- and we’d like to thank all of our design collaborators and builders for their beautiful work, we look forward to formally recognizing these teams in print!
Tierwelthaus, photographed by Paul Dyer, rests in the hills of Portola Valley,  exemplifying the native beauty of drought resistant landscaping.
Echo Knoll, photographed by Joe Fletcher, dramatically soars above San Jose, nestled into a hillside oasis.
A recent project brought us into the very heart of San Francisco’s iconic Salesforce tower, and what a sight it was! This project, photographed by Paul Dryer, excited and challenged us, and assured us that we are more than ready to dive deeper into commercial and hospitality design- bringing our modern, residential, and personal sensibilities along with us. See our most recent commercial work here.

In other news, we are happy to report that our Third Thursday tradition is alive and well! To kick off a fun, productive, and creative summer, the team at Feldman Architecture was lucky enough to be invited into Reuben Margolin’s private studio in Emeryville, CA. Reuben, a truly gifted kinetic sculpture artist, is a longtime friend of FA, and even created a kinetic sculpture piece that’s featured in our Telegraph Hill house. Read more about the visit on our blog!
Yesterday, our very own Jonathan Feldman spoke at the AIA San Francisco event: “What’s Cooking: New Trends in Restaurant Architecture + Design” for San Francisco Design Week. He shared new perspectives in restaurant architecture and design, communal dining experiences, and much more alongside innovators from BAMO, Lundberg Design, and Silicon Valley Magazine.
And finally, we’re so excited to welcome Eric Willits and Isabel Verhille to the FA team! Eric, a recent graduate from Cal Berkeley, joins us as our new Administrative Assistant, and Isabel, coming from a background in PR, communications, and sustainability, as our Marketing Coordinator. Isabel is eager to connect with friendly faces about upcoming projects- which are aplenty. Please reach out to her and say hello:
Isabel Verhille
iverhille@feldmanarch.com
415 252 1441 x224
As the summer rolls on, keep your eyes peeled for these projects to go up on our website, as well as into our favorite publications! And as always, please stay in touch.
– Feldman Architecture

 

https://www.houzz.com/pro/feldmanarchitecture/feldman-architecture-inc
https://www.instagram.com/feldmanarchitecture/?hl=en
https://www.facebook.com/FeldmanArch/
https://feldmanarchitecture.com/
https://www.pinterest.com/feldmanarch/pins/
Twitter

Third Thursday June 2019: Reuben Margolin...

To kick off a fun, productive, and creative summer, the team at Feldman Architecture was lucky enough to be invited into Reuben Margolin’s private studio in Emeryville, CA. Reuben, a truly gifted kinetic sculpture artist, is a longtime friend of FA, and even created a kinetic sculpture piece that’s featured in our Telegraph Hill house.

Reuben has been creating his fascinating, mathematic, ever-changing sculptures for the last twenty years, “seeking to combine the sensuousness of nature with the logic of math.” After studying English and Math at Harvard, and travelling and studying around the world, Reuben created his first series of kinetic sculptures, lovingly named the Caterpillars (which reminded us of our own work…). These enchanting creations made of thousands of pieces of wood, string, and pulleys, draw upon mathematical and natural inspiration to crawl along the floor; the piece is powered by physics, and some extra-large batteries. We watched one of his caterpillars (shown below) scooch along the floor of his warehouse, perplexing even our most seasoned architects with its complex design and artistic curvature.

From caterpillars, Reuben departed in an explosion of different artistic directions, drawing inspiration from the natural world around him, such as the sea and the wind. We asked countless questions and closely inspected and admired Reuben’s wave creations- beautiful dangling webs of string and wood that smoothly glide through complicated systems of thousands of pulleys. These structures, suspended in air, break away “from the stubbornness of the ground” and allow for a smoother motion and more possibility in terms of lateral movement.

While enjoying some beers and snacks in Reuben’s studio, Reuben patiently answered a steady line of questioning from our designers (and Tai’s kids) covering a range of topics: design, transportation, logistics, and artistic inspiration. Reuben described projects that hotels, offices, private homes, and even one dance company commissioned, outlining the sometimes comical task of commodifying his art.

We all left in a state of awe, deeply impressed by Reuben’s mathematical mind and artistic creativity- feeling inspired to bring some of what we learned into our own work (both conceptually and literally). Please find more of Reuben’s work here, and reach out if you have any questions about what you see, or would like to connect with him directly!

Project Collaboration With BIM 360...

By Laura Knight

Recently a few of our design teams have begun utilizing a useful Revit tool known as BIM 360 for project collaboration. You may ask yourself, what is BIM 360?

This exciting and powerful software enables our architectural models to be accessed via a remote server, meaning consultants can access project files directly from their offices to incorporate their own work! In my previous studios I’ve personally used BIM 360 for large-scale commercial design to streamline coordination with structural engineers.

BIM 360 also has a companion application on Android and IOS, meaning team members and collaborators can access up-to-date plans and project documents anywhere, at any time.

How will this software be utilized by our firm in the future? As Feldman Architects inevitably leads and contributes to more commercial design projects, and to more residential projects outside our native San Francisco, BIM 360 will become a key tool in effective project coordination. Effective project management and beautiful design are born of powerful instruments!

Staff Spotlight: Serena Brown...

Q: Where are you from?

I grew up in San Jose and lived in the same house for all of my childhood. Our neighborhood was a great one for playing outdoors – in the front yard or in the street. It was one of those neighborhoods that seemed to have hordes of kids my age, which made for memorable summers. My family would come up to San Francisco some weekends and when we had visitors from out of town. I remember driving around, hitting all the popular spots, and riding the cable car. Despite my experience being largely related to the ‘touristy areas’, those trips are what made me want to move up here.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I went to Cal Poly, San Louis Obispo and studied Communications with a focus on Intercultural Communications. I chose that my major because I was told that it was basically English with more job options. That, and I love writing, speaking, and all things interpersonal.  I was especially interested in Intercultural Communications because I love to travel and the professor I had for that specific class in college was extremely inspiring. He made the subject matter engaging and interesting even for those who weren’t in the major.  My interest was furthered by my time studying abroad. I went to London for a semester my third year and traveled around as much as I could. Due to that experience, I ended up doing my senior project on reverse culture shock in expats.

Q: Tell me about your family

My mom and dad live in San Jose and I try to visit at least once a month.  My mom chose to become a stay-at-home mom when I was born and my dad stopped working when I was in 2nd grade when he got sick. They were both around at home for my entire childhood, which was a blessing and a curse! But mostly a blessing.

My sister, who is three years younger than me, is graduating from Chapman University in May. She’s adorable and currently looking for her first ever big girl job.  She studied communications and marketing as well but her interest leans more toward PR.  She’s really graphically minded and I’m the wordsmith so we’re opposites in that regard. She and I get along well, though she jokes that I “became a great big sister once I left the house.” I enjoy helping her with school projects and now job hunting. In return, she’s recently started to help facilitate my plant addiction.

Q: What is the most interesting aspect of architecture to you?

Hmmm… There are a few interesting aspects that come to mind. One thing that I never took notice of before working here is the crazy difference of opinion that so many people have about architecture. I always thought that there was traditional, modern, and something in between but have since learned that architecture is much more faceted than I ever gave it credit for.

In the past I’d been interested in cultural differences when it came to architecture and how those differences can translate across borders. I’ve always been very appreciative of beautiful buildings when I travel.  Whenever I take photos, they are always of people, and buildings…and food.  Actually I guess that covers everything.

One thing that I would consider a new development is my understanding of architecture as trendy. I’d never thought of it that way before, but after following so many architecture influencers on Instagram… I’ve changed my mind!

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

I’ve worked here for roughly one year and one month and I’m the last Staff Spotlight!

Q: What makes our office unique?

Oh man, well, I’ll just regurgitate what everyone else has said first and then give my own opinion.  The people of course. I had the best coworkers in the world at my last job and I never thought I could top that. Then I found a whole new group of people in this job and thought ‘oh, I can find awesome people even outside of Japan’!  The amount that everyone talks to each other every day is fabulous.  Everyone is always walking across the office and stopping at different desks, it’s surprising any of us get anything done! I’m pretty sure I exchange words with nearly every designer every day, even if they are just asking me where to find a specific supply in the storage room.

Q: What were you doing in Japan before joining Feldman?

I was teaching English in a small commuter city called Matsudo.  It’s in the Chiba prefecture about an hour northeast of Tokyo. I was teaching at what’s called an eikaiwa or English conversation school. My students ranged from age 3 all the way to 73, so the whole range of human existence really. I lived and worked there for a year and loved every minute.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

I like that I have a routine but also that every day is different.  I like seeing and talking to people that I am fond of.  I also like the office itself.  It’s beautiful, there’s a lot of light, it’s comfortable, and I have a big desk. I enjoy the many responsibilities that my position is in charge of, and that I get to make everyone else’s days a little bit easier.

Q: What is the last show you binge watched?

Queer Eye season three.  I recently took a weekend up to Guerneville with my boyfriend, Jeremy and we took some time to just relax in the evenings and binge Queer Eye after hiking, eating and exploring during the day.  We cry almost every episode. It’s a great bonding experience.

Q: Do you have any fun plans coming up?

I have a lot of plans! I’m 100% a planner. This weekend is the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japantown which I absolutely have to attend. I also have plans to go to Peru in June with my mom and sister.  We were going to do a four-day trek to Machu Picchu but now my mom’s knees aren’t doing too well so we are probably going to take the train.  I also have tickets to three music events in June, July and August.  And that’s just so far! Hopefully I can go abroad again in the fall, Jeremy and I are thinking about Iceland, South East Asia, or New Zealand.

Staff Spotlight: Bianca Mills...

Q: Where are you from?

My dad was in the military so I never quite know how to answer that. I’ve lived in San Francisco longer than anywhere else, on and off since I was eight. At this point I’ve lived here for about 19 years total. I like living in the city because I’m close to most of my family, I like the unpredictable weather, and I think there’s some of the best restaurants in the country here. That, and I live in a rent controlled apartment that I’m not planning to leave anytime soon.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I started at New York University in the photography department and I graduated with a psychology degree from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I switched majors when I switched schools because psychology seemed a little more practical and was something I’d always had an equal interest in. While at NYU I was taking abnormal psych as an elective while most people in my class were taking electives like ‘circus’ and ‘acting,’ which were very popular.

Q: Tell me about your family?

My parents are both retired and will be celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary this year. They live in Kentfield, Marin. My dad was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army while my mother worked in retail most of my life and had a few interior design clients after she retired.

My sister is in marketing. She and her husband live in San Rafael with my nephews, James and William. My brother and his wife recently moved to Austin with my niece, Sadie, and nephew, Brady. My niece and nephews are my favorites. My prized possessions are a large collection of bee drawings for ‘aunt Bee’.  I spend time with them as often as I can. Living in Austin makes it difficult to see Sadie and Brady outside of FaceTime.  James and William are at the age where they seem to have sports every day that they don’t have school. I go to their games and make dates with them as much as possible.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

I’ve always enjoyed administrative positions in creative fields but I got into architecture specifically by accident. I’m both right and left brain so I’ve always been interested in creative arts as well as organizational tasks, finance spreadsheets, and human behavior. These types of roles are a way to combine the two. Also, creative professions tend to have office cultures that I fit in better with as opposed to dry, homogenized, corporate environments.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

I’m coming up on my 5th anniversary in May.

Q: What makes our office unique?

I agree with what everyone else has said but don’t really want to just repeat it. I like that it’s casual and there are always different conversations going on. I like that everyone is very different but can appreciate the same sense of humor.  Our staff meetings usually include a lot of laughter.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

I like the atmosphere and that I’m able to just be myself. I can wear jeans and converse every day. I live close enough to walk to work. Feldman has a great group of people that I both respect on a professional level and also care about on a personal level.

Q: Do you have any fun plans coming up?

I actually do! I am going to Paris for the first week of June and stopping in Dublin on my way home to see The Cure at Malahide Castle!  They’ve been my favorite band since I was 14.

Q: What are the top three things on your bucket list?

To do a gorilla trek in Rwanda, to live somewhere in Europe for at least a year and to take my mom as my date to the Oscars the year I win for Best Original Screenplay.

Spring Newsletter 2019...

Springtime in San Francisco

Promotions, new hires, photo shoots, and publication announcements? It must be Spring!

One of our newly photographed projects, dubbed ‘The Meadow Home’, was inspired by prominent views and beautiful slopes. The design team, made up of Lutsko Associates, Zaharias Design, Strandberg Engineering, Kim Cladas Lighting Design, Art of Construction, and BKF Engineers strove to integrate the structure into the landscape to minimize its massing within a large undeveloped meadow. Kudos to whole team for a beautiful job well done!

This designer should be a familiar face! Daniel has been an integral part of the Feldman team since 2013 and we’re thrilled to announce that this past December he became the newest Associate at our firm! With fourteen years of experience behind him, he’s continuing to excel as a project lead and is always sharing his knowledge with those around him.

In 2019 we’ve also added two more designers to the Feldman Family! Kateryna Rogynska joins us after working at Morphosis in Los Angeles, UNstudio in Amsterdam, LAVA in Berlin, and SOM here in San Francisco. She is a multidisciplinary creator with extensive experience in institutional, commercial, office, and high-rise design projects and we’re excited to have her join the team!

With two decades of experience in high value residential projects in both the Bay Area and Southern California, Jeremy Alden joins us as a seasoned Project Manger with an integrated knowledge of design and construction. He’s been living and working in the Bay Area for 6+ years, with a few of his noted projects being the Walt Disney Family Museum, San Carlos Medical Center, and Cavallo Point.

If you’ve been keeping up with our work you may have noticed an influx of projects added to our On The Boards page. Two projects in Los Altos Hills and Portola Valley respectively, Floating Bar House (top left) and Pan’Orama  (top right) broke ground last year and are continuing construction into 2019. The Pavilions (bottom left) in Atherton are nearly finished and the team is looking to wrap up at the end of April. Finally, Surf House (bottom right) down in Santa Cruz has been making great progress and has provided a wonderful opportunity for our marketing team to play with their new drone.

Started close to three years ago, one of our Pro-Bono projects is set to finish this coming May! The Playworks office near Jack London Square is a playful and whimsical space, reflective of the clients and their unique brand of recreation. Keep an eye out for this month’s issue of Registry SF for a behind the scenes look at how this project evolved and came together.

Finally, we’re happy to share that Sophia Beavis returned from maternity leave in early February and our designers participated in an in-house baby photo guessing game to celebrate. As you can see, everyone was quite amused with the results.

We have a handful of photo shoots coming up this spring and we’re excited to share new work with you all in the coming months. Stay tuned for a publication announcement next week… we’ll give you a hint, we’ve been on the cover once before!

– Feldman Architecture

 

An Interview with David Toews of BayWest Builders...

By Serena Brown

A few months back I was given the opportunity to tag along on a site meeting to Los Altos Hills. My purpose was to interview David Toews, BayWest Builder’s superintendent on site at the Round House. I’ve been interested in this project since I started at Feldman Architecture due to its unique circular shape, and the innovative ways the various teams have tackled the challenges that come with a perfectly round form; notably David’s creation ‘The Tool’.

For the first hour or so I had free reign to explore the home, snapping photos and admiring the views. Once the meetings had finished and the walk-through was complete, David was happy to sit down with me and discuss his background in construction, as well as his excitement for this particular project. Despite his current construction expertise, David grew up in a musical family. His father was a brilliant composer who started the Cabrillo College Music Festival, though for reasons unknown encouraged David away from the musical path. David joked that he “wasn’t sure if it was due to the difficulty of the business or [his] lack of musical talent!”

At age six he was given his first tool set, which he promptly got taken away by his mother after sawing through a support beam on his front porch. During his early teen years he attended an alternative high school / college and turned his attentions toward the medical industry. He decided at 17 that medicine wasn’t for him after dropping out of college to pursue other interests. At 19 he entered his first carpentry job, but wasn’t yet thinking of it as a trade. Shortly after, he was taken under the wing of Ed Powell as a carpenters apprentice and his career in construction really began.  From Ed he learned not only the hands-on skills associated with construction, but also the values behind his way of business. As a child he had spent time with his uncle learning how to build architectural models, paint with watercolors, and generally learning how to problem solve. The time with his uncle had a huge influence on his later life, and his time with Ed reminded him of those experiences.

Following his tenure with Ed Powell, David went on to work at Pressman Construction where he learned about business management but felt the company didn’t extol the same values he’d admired in Ed. In 1986 he started his own company, built on core tenants he believed in, and ran it for 30 years. He proudly kept his clients happy but admits that despite being a good builder, he wasn’t a very good businessman. Thus, his company closed in 2016. For the past three years he’s worked under the leadership of Derek Gray, which he happily says allows him to focus on what he loves most—building.

The Round House is situated up in Los Altos Hills with views of the Bay from the kitchen and living room. The clients fell in love with this quirky circular home and later made the decision to remodel. Since the house is a perfect circle, David stressed that geometry and strict calculations were important from the get-go. He felt from the beginning that the house needed a compass to guide its construction. He told me that when he’s planning out a job, he views the building in layers, starting from the foundation all the way through framing and steel work. Getting each layer done right is what causes a project to succeed. After seeing the plans for the Round House, long before starting the project, he had a dream about the Sundial Bridge in Redding and in the morning the idea for the perfect tool dawned on him. Derek approved of his plan and after telling the owners, architects, and subs, told him he’d better build it!

‘The Tool’, a cross between a trammel arm and compass, is 16ft tall with a 45ft long boom. Its function was to properly measure the circumference of the house during the construction of its foundation and walls. It helped the team keep track of the vectors in plan and make sure each wall lined up with its counterpart. The name for ‘The Tool’ was inspired by a Russian carpenter who worked for David many years ago. He put together a complex piece of furniture without any fasteners; the through dovetail mortise and tenon connections were locked in place using a small block of wood that tapped the parts into position.  He said if you were to take it apart, save the ‘TOOL’, which he had written on the piece of wood. David laughed when he said the name stuck with him and thought he’d pay homage to the work ethic of the man who thought of it. And of course, he still has the ¼ x ¼ x 4” ‘TOOL.’  David said that while he was building it his “heart said it’ll work but [his] mind was still questioning it.” Finally though, “it just took flight.”

Now that the project is past framing, the team no longer has use for ‘The Tool’. David likened it to a “dragon friend in Game of Thrones” and was sad to take it down. He hopes that he won’t have to dismantle it, and is looking at donating it to somewhere like a children’s museum. If anyone knows a good place to display it, please let us know!

When asked about the challenges he faced in this project, David had only positives to share. He mentioned how exciting it is to work on this type of job, and how he’s constantly excited to jump out of bed in the morning and come to work. You can tell that David is truly following his passion, and that problem solving is in his nature. He believes in constantly learning, adapting, and holds the view that ‘information doesn’t just fall from the sky, [he] was very fortunate to have mentors to pass on knowledge that had in turn been passed on to them.”

I want to extend a huge thank you to David for taking the time to speak with me and share his story regarding this fascinating project, and his storied career path and passions. Make sure to check back On the Boards for updates as construction on the Round House should be finishing up later this year!

Staff Spotlight: Jeremy Alden...

Q: Where are you from?

I was grew up on a farm outside of Albany, Oregon, in the self-proclaimed grass seed capital of the world. We had sheep, cows and chickens, which was a lot of work when I was growing up. I spent the good portion of my childhood on the business end of a shovel.  I lived in the same house for most of my childhood, but we eventually bought the bigger house next door and moved in there.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I did my fresh year at the University of San Francisco and then finished my undergrad at the University of Oregon. For my Masters, I attended Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

At USF I majored in advertising design while at U of Oregon I pursued fine arts with a concentration in photography as well as landscape architecture. I worked as press photographer in college and really enjoyed that medium. However, I didn’t want to be a press photographer my whole life and found landscape arch compelling. At Pratt I studied industrial design with a focus on furniture and ceramics.

Q: Who is in your family?

I have a brother and a sister, both younger. My wife, Simran, and I have a three year old named Caden. Siman is a real estate agent for Vanguard and Caden is a Senior Vice President at Twitter (well not really – he goes to preschool).

My brother is a mechanical engineer and my sister is a physical therapist. They live in Eugene and Portland. Fun fact: my mom and dad were on the amazing race, season 19. They went far, but didn’t win. If you ever want a traumatic experience, watch you parents bodybuilding on national television.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

From a young age, I was fascinated with building things.

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I like balancing bold creative visions with high client expectations and working with contractors and subcontractors that are highly knowledgeable.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

Just over a month.

Q: What makes our office unique?

It’s very different from my former office. It’s full of light and air and collaborative design conversations.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

I’m at a point right now where I’m learning about the firm, its processes, and developing relationships with colleagues; all of which I enjoy.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

Nope

Q: What’s your design process like?

Lots of ideation to begin. Followed by practical assessment and refinement.

Q: When was the last time you did something for the first time? What was it?

I rode a camel for the first time in November because my son wanted to. This was in the UAE. It was short and sweet. Much like this interview.

Q: Have you ever won a contest or award?

Yes, I was Mr. San Francisco Movember 2009. Movember happens in November and is a fundraiser for prostate cancer research. To participate, you grow a mustache and attend a party. At the party there’s a costume contest and I rocked it!

Page 1 of 2512345...1020...Last »