Staff Spotlight: Liza Karimova...

Q: Where are you from?

I’m from Moscow, Russia, but I was born in Austria. I moved here about five years ago to attend university and before that I was living in Switzerland for a few years. I’ve lived in four different countries so far.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I went to UC Berkeley for architecture. In addition to the standard undergraduate curriculum I took some material science engineering classes.

Before attending university here, I visited California only once, but I really liked it. UC Berkeley was actually the only school I applied to in California and when I decided to come here my parents had a bit of a shock. They didn’t want me to move so far away from my family after already being in boarding school for 4 years. It took a bit of convincing but here I am!

Q: Who is in your family?

My parents, two dogs, and a twin brother who looks nothing like me! He’s much taller and blonde. I also have a tiny parrot who I haven’t seen in ages. Technically he’s a replacement parrot since they don’t live very long… I don’t know what he’s called anymore!

Q: What is one talent you wish you had?

I wish I could do a backflip… my goal is to learn how to do one before I die.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

In high school I always enjoyed art, physics, and English and I thought architecture was a good way to combine all three. I also attended after-school art classes for four years, where we created for hours every day after regular school.

Honestly though, at first I really didn’t want to do it because my parents were pressuring me into it. Until one summer I took an architecture course at USC. It was the first time I stayed up all night working on a project, which I weirdly found really fun and fulfilling.

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I really enjoy projects that have some room for the unknown, where the design process can be like an experiment. It fascinates me to design living and working spaces, because it reveals so much about human nature. I have always enjoyed the sciences, so this is that part of me speaking.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

Just over a year! Not counting my internship.

Q: What makes our office unique?

A lot of people say that it feels like a family – which is true, minus the drama. Everyone is so laid back! I love how comfortable we feel around each other.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

There’s so much positivity and laughter! People really care about staying happy and making beautiful architecture. I also love our roof deck, I go there quite a lot.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

I wouldn’t say that I have a role model, but I do have people I’m inspired by. Most of them are on the conceptual side of architecture. For example I like the work of John Hejduk and Martin Heidegger. They think outside the box and outside constraints of reality. I guess their work is more concerned with the human condition, temporality, and symbolism.

Q: What’s your design process like?

I try to stick to one simple idea but I almost always get side-tracked. And that often ends up being the best part- happy accidents! Although when I overthink things, it’s sometimes hard to tell whether an idea is good or just absurd. I always fluctuate between a logical and scientific approach, and a more intuitive one – sometimes, it’s hard to find the right balance of both!

Q: If someone designed a drink after you, what would be in it/what would it taste like?

A caramel latte, sometimes with a few shots of whiskey.

 

Staff Spotlight: Ben Welty...

Q: Where are you from?

Summerville, South Carolina. It’s a suburb of Charleston that had a small town feel while I was growing up but has gotten much bigger as urban sprawl has taken hold. Regardless, I have no plans of going back.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I received a BA in Architecture from Clemson University before heading to the University of Kansas to get my Masters. I chose KU to participate in their renowned Studio 804 design/build program.

Q: Who is in your family?

My parents are both retired and still live in the house I grew up in. My brother lives in my hometown as well and I’ve got two nieces and nephews.

My wife is an interior designer. We met at the University of Kansas and both moved out here after graduating. We got married in June of last year and had our reception in our current office back when it was an event space. We held the last event here before it became our design studio. Jonathan and Steven now sit where we had our first dance.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

As a kid I was always playing with Legos and exploring houses under construction in my neighborhood. I just walked onto the construction sites on the weekends when no one was around; we didn’t ask. My aunt was a builder so I would spend some time as a kid with her on job sites.

I also took some architecture classes in high school, mostly drafting classes, before formally studying it in college.

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I mostly enjoy working on custom residential projects, specifically single family residential. I like doing new houses and new construction as well as remodels in the city. There are different aspects and challenges to both that I enjoy.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

Four years this past May. Before starting here I was working at a small firm in SOMA.

Q: What makes our office unique?

Our collaborative design process and the fact that it’s not a top down approach. Everyone gets involved, has a voice, and contributes. And that’s encouraged.

Plus, it’s only a ten minute walk from my house!

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

It’s so close!

I just enjoy the work that I do and the people I work with. I’m very lucky to be surrounded by such talented individuals who have a passion for what they do. They make me a better architect and designer.

Q: If you could only eat one type of food for the rest of your life, what would it be?

SOUTH Carolina style BBQ pulled pork dressed in Carolina gold, a mustard based BBQ sauce. Not to be confused with the more colloquial Carolina style pulled pork from eastern North Carolina, an amalgamation of poorly cooked meat and an astringent vinegar-based sauce that is masked with a scoop of coleslaw. If you have to put coleslaw on your BBQ, it’s not good BBQ.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

Not really. I admire different aspects of a lot of people that I try to emulate and learn from, including everyone I’ve ever worked for or with.  I take notice of the qualities in others that I admire. Whatever characteristics I spot in them that make them successful and effective leaders are ones I try to adopt as well.

Q: What’s your design process like?

When assigned a project, I first like to dive into the history behind a site or building as well as its context. A lot can be learned by studying the nuances of a place, and more often than not those studies lead to design inspiration. From there it’s about creating spaces that are appropriate in their surroundings and functional in their purpose.

I like to work in section early on to apply a three dimensional perspective to the conceptual and schematic processes. Otherwise you run the risk of the tail wagging the dog if you try to force this perspective to conform to the two dimensional plan. However, that is not the only thing to be considered as architecture is actually experienced in four dimensions, time being the fourth, so an understanding of how a space will be experienced throughout the course of the day and year is also crucial.

Q: Do you have any hidden talents?

Not really. I co-host a podcast that covers Clemson athletics but I won’t be quitting my day job anytime soon.

Staff Spotlight: Lindsey Theobald...

Q: Where are you from?

I’m from Napa, California, not far from here. The place I grew up has a small town feel, everybody knew everybody and everybody’s parents were friends. My house growing up was next to a creek and my sister and I used to explore it all the time. I remember my parents always going with their friends to the surrounding wineries and I would hate it and refuse to leave the car. But now it’s nice that it’s close by since I can visit often as a getaway.

Q: Where did you go to school?

Cal poly, where I studied architecture. The school is unique in that you have to declare a major when you apply, so I decided to become an architect at 17. Luckily it stuck. In my first year, I joined an optional class that was pretty computer heavy. It got into InDesign and modeling, before the advent of all the super cool modeling we use today.

I really started to enjoy my major in my 3rd year. The studios got more competitive and we all started vying for certain teachers, as it really mattered what teacher you got. In my 4th year everyone went abroad; I went to Denmark, which was amazing. Even though the school was all American, I lived in student housing with Danes. The dorms weren’t connected to the school, they were just housing for a multitude of students nearby. 5th year was thesis year and I ended up getting my favorite professor, which was great.

CalPoly always felt like a quintessential “California” school.  We biked everywhere, had big backyard BBQ house parties, hit up reggae night downtown on Wednesdays, and really enjoyed the small-town feel of SLO.  That said, studying a whole year in Europe and traveling practically everywhere throughout the continent was a welcome reprieve to the small town life I’d lived so far.  Best of both worlds.

Q: Tell me about your family.

I have a mom, dad, and sister all close by. I have two kids, eight and five with the younger one turning six in august. My husband, who’s a landscape architect, I met at Cal Poly. I’m super fortunate to have my mom drive all the way from Napa three days a week to watch my kids after school.  My family is super close, so it feels natural to have my mom and dad be a big part of my kids’ lives.  I have a big extended family too and we try to get together as much as possible, whether it’s big trips to Kauai or quick weekend trips to celebrate graduations.  We all just got back from my sister’s ranch near the Sequoia National Forest.  My kids are obsessed with my cousins’ kids, so it’s constant fun whenever we all get together.  The rest of my family is very musical, so there is always a lot of playing instruments and singing when we all get together.  I’m hoping the gift of musical talent rubs off on my kids.  Or at least singing on key.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

I guess my interest started in high school since I declared that as my major on my Cal Poly application. I applied for biology in all other schools except that one. I don’t remember what I thought I was going to do with biology, but I think I went for architecture because it was pretty specific and it seemed to be more exciting and defined. There wasn’t the typical “I love lego” phase or anything like that. I just liked design. I never took any art classes, so I wasn’t hugely artistic but I remember my mom and I designing my room all the time; rearranging the furniture, choosing the colors, and I found that to be super fun. I was into coloring and mixing patterns, just general childlike creativity.

What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I’m not specifically interested in the size or budget necessarily, but I really enjoy working with people who are willing to take more risks and or try some cool designs rather than play it safe. I love it when clients get excited about some crazy light fixture, finish, or piece of furniture that I’ve found. It comes down to the clients, not the project type or budget, but whether or not the homeowners are going to join me in taking them down this wild path to a unique project at the end.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

Since 2006. I was practicing architecture in San Diego before I moved here. That company has since moved to Colorado as they weren’t into SoCal politics. Besides that brief stint after college this is basically my one and done career.

Q: What makes our office unique?

I think it’s the lack of ego, which drives Jonathan to always pay close attention to who he hires. He bases a large part of his decision on personality and making sure our office culture stays collaborative, fun, and humble. He’s always done a good job of doing that. It’s more fluid now that we’re bigger than it was back then. For five years I worked with the same five people, so it’s nice to see some new faces and learn from all the new experiences and varied backgrounds they bring.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

I’m never too bummed about the tasks I have to do or the projects I’m working on, plus the people are fun to be around. I fundamentally agree with the way we approach design and work and I don’t feel like I’m coming to some place where I have to battle against others’ opinions. The office feels like a good nurturing community. Every day I’m always finding different ways to grow that I wasn’t expecting, whether it’s focusing on helping colleagues, learning from them, or collaborating with team members.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

Well, Patricia Urquiola kicks butt.  I took notice of her after I realized that every furniture piece or tile I was liking was of her design.  I appreciate her celebration of colors and texture.  She can be modern without having the negative connotations that occasionally go with  the term: like sleek, cold, and sterile.  She can use a huge range of colors, a multi-hued palette, and still have her pieces feel neutral and timeless.  Same with textures – her textures can be so outrageous, but on her specific pieces, they feel just right.  I also appreciate that she took her design sensibilities from architecture into product design and interiors.  She must have fun getting to design every little thing.

Another favorite of mine is John Pawson.  Quite on the other end of the spectrum from Patricia Urquiola.  His interiors are the epitome of minimal, but a minimalism that is so appealing because of the strong emphasis on materiality.  A room of his design can be empty, but it still feel inviting because of the rich materials he uses –textured concrete; smooth wood with tight detailing; and natural light softening white walls and ceilings.  The combination of pretty natural materials with crisp detailing is effective.

Q: What’s your design process like?

I’m visual, so I love looking at images of things on Pinterest or other websites. I find a lot of inspiration in images first and often ask for reference images from the client.  Then I know what look and feel we are trying to achieve.  Images are pretty effective for interior projects, which make up a large part of my work.  It’s an effective way for the client to share their vision or ideal aesthetic with me and vice versa.  Once I have a clear idea of the look and feel, I try to figure out the material palette.  I get the physical materials in front of me before moving forward. We’re constantly getting new materials for our office library that I (try to!) organize and keep up to date.  The new library is so lovely and I feel like a kid in a candy store here!

Q: What’s the nicest compliment you’ve ever been given?

My husband just told me that I’m emotionally mature.  Meaning that I am thoughtful in my reactions to others. That kind of blew me away, especially since I’m not always mature in my reactions towards him!  But, I do tend to see the best in others and that leads to more positive interactions.  I think it’s really important to give people the benefit of the doubt.  I’m an optimist!

Q: Where is your favorite spot to go in the city?

It’s different to think about because my experiences right now are through my kids. I love taking them on the ferry here and then going exploring around the city. It’s stress free! I can get a drink on the ferry and relax, plus the kids love the thrill of the ride. We are members of the Exploratorium, so we’ve spent many a weekend there.  For restaurants, I’m partial to the Presidio Social Club, especially if you get to sit on the back patio.  A glass of wine plus their fries and aioli and I’m set!

Staff Spotlight: Chris Kay...

Q: Where are you from?

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama where I spent the majority of my life. It’s a small metropolitan area surrounded by five very suburban areas. Most people, myself included, grew up in those surrounding suburbs because the city was vacant and dangerous. Over the past ten years or so they’ve implemented a lot of money back into the city, lighting up tunnels, opening parks, bars, restaurants etc, which has made it a lot safer and a more enjoyable place to live. Now nearly everyone is fighting over property to be a part of its tremendous growth.

Q: Where did you go to school?

After high school I attended the University of Alabama at Birmingham for two years perusing a BFA in graphics design. In 2012 I transferred from UAB into the architecture program at Auburn University where I later graduated. I also had some summer stints at Jefferson State due to the fact that none of my credits transferred from UAB to Auburn.

Q: Who is in your family?

I’m the youngest of four kids – two brothers and one sister – all stubborn and raised under the world’s strongest mother. We also had a feisty little Lhasa Apso named Max. Everyone, excluding me, was born in Ruston Louisiana where my parents met. We live all over now with our partners – four are in Nashville, two in Nebraska, and my parents both live in Birmingham. Myself and my gorgeous lady moved out here to the bay in 2017. My family means the world to me.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

Like many, I always had an interest in building things. But I never really had a plan of implementing those interests until I took a 3D sculpture studio at UAB. The professor had a unique way of looking at the world. The first day of studio he spoke about objects, and how their quality could be measured by the effect of their presence – or the way they effected the space surrounding them. Not an original thought necessarily but it really resonated with me. So much so that I set up a time to speak with him later that week. That conversation is where I learned of his previous career in architecture. After that I figured I should look further into the profession.

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I haven’t really had enough experience in architecture to pinpoint any particular area of interest but I know right now I’m most interested in the smaller details and the accuracy involved in their design.  I like working with my hands—any tangible problem will keep me occupied and interested well past sleep deprivation.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

I started in early March of 2018.

Q: What makes our office unique?

My initial draw to Feldman was due to the work the company does in the residential field. Looking through the projects, there was a clear indication of uninterrupted atmosphere. There’s this unique balance between the effect of the building on its environment, and an environment on the building—I appreciated that honesty in design. But after visiting the office for the first time, the all-around engaging attitude of each person I met sealed my fate. What makes Feldman so unique is the people who work here. Everyone is incredibly intelligent and it’s exciting to come to work every day with the ability to learn from your peers.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

Aside from my previous answer; the opportunity to see up to three doggos at one time.

Q: What do you like to do for fun outside of the office?

I like to build things. I also like rock climbing and soccer. I enjoy working on mechanical things too, specifically motorcycle engines though I don’t have a motorcycle anymore. I built two bikes the year prior to moving out here; five days before I moved I finally got one of them running. But I had to sell them both before I left Birmingham. When my girlfriend and I left Alabama we sold everything we had. We put the remainder of our stuff in a 4×4 carriage, shipped it off, and flew out here. So if anyone out there wants to donate a bike…

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

The person who has taught me the most is a long haired Fabio-esque man named Kyle D-Agostino, also known as “The Sausage Emperor”. I say this reluctantly knowing that if he ever reads this article, his boastuous nature will never let me forget it. Kyle was the architectural director at Appleseed Workshop where I worked before moving to the bay area. He taught me a lot in both architecture and in life.

Q: What’s your design process like?

I think the way to design anything is to first identify the problem. Then boil that problem down to its fundamentals and start from there. This is the easiest way for me to understand something well enough to confidently design a solution.

Q: What piece of advice would you give your younger self having lived your life up until now?

Read more than The Iceberg Hermit.

Staff Spotlight: Michael Trentacosti...

Q: Where are you from?

I was born just outside New York City, in a small town called Nyack. I lived there the majority of my life before leaving to go to college at the University of Colorado in Boulder. I ended up staying in Boulder for one year after school, five years in total. I then moved to Astoria Queens for four months before packing up everything and moving out west to San Francisco. I’ve been here now for a year and half.

Q: Tell me about your family

Both my parents went to culinary school and were chefs for a while. My dad started “Cater to You Food Service” which specializes in farm to table school lunches for high end schools in new tri-state area. My sister also works for his company as the head of event coordination.

My mom is a dietician who specializes in food medicine. Basically she looks at how food can be used as a substitute and how a lot of the issues that society deals with today can be cured by food rather than medicine. It’s based around the idea that if you’re eating healthy and on a specific diet you can combat or prevent diseases. She does this in conjunction with curating meal plans for students at the schools I mentioned before. She also volunteers on New York City Board of Education to teach less privileged individuals in city schools about cooking and basic nutritional facts.

Q: Please visually describe your personality

I have to think about this one… Okay imagine you walk into a hole-in-the-wall pizzeria in New York City. The place is packed but you walk through to the kitchen. You push through the door and everyone in there is yelling at each other, but not in a demeaning way, think collaboration. It looks and sounds like chaos, but organized chaos. A first glance you may get the impression that it’s loud and crazy and disorganized but in reality it’s a very methodical and orchestrated craziness that ultimately produces something desirable in the end.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

I noticed when I was really young that most kids my age were obsessed with dinosaurs, but I was obsessed with construction. To preface this story, I was an avid snowboarder when I was a kid, but didn’t have daily access to quality snowboarding parks. I took it upon myself to build snowboard parks in my friends’ backyards as a hobby. Half the time I had no idea what I was doing, I was just a young kid screwing plywood together and making things out of it. I don’t think the experience necessarily got me into architecture, but I did develop an interest in design and building things.

As I grew older I developed even more of a passion for building. When I eventually went to college, I had a few friends in architecture related majors. I used to see their work, ask them about what they were doing, and eventually I grew an interest in it as well. It actually didn’t dawn on me until graduation that all of these things (liking construction, the snowboard parks) came full circle and built off of each other.

My passion for construction as a young child was ultimately where my interest in design stemmed from and curated through the years. It grew from an interest in construction to a love of architecture.

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

Definitely detail-oriented residential. I like to curate space based off of a particular need of an individual. I believe that residential projects are the most customizable and the most interesting. They really come down to detailing and I personally find a lot of interest in how the details of a building come together.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

3 weeks!

Q: What makes our office unique?

For one, the office itself. Being in an old firehouse means the space has a lot of history and culture, especially for this area. It seems like it’s a pretty symbolic building in the Polk Gulch district. I like how there’s a ton of natural light in the office as well. I feel like in a lot of traditional offices there’s more of an objective towards the work rather than the space, which makes sense. But the space we work in here; it’s inspiring.

Everyone’s attitude towards each other in the office is also pretty unique, no one is trying to compete and everyone is working with each other. There’s this office bond that allows everyone to be themselves, be open to conversations, and communicate in a friendly manner. We have this ability to be professional yet causal with one another.

Lastly, the level of experience that every individual brings to the table is different. Each individual inputs their own strengths into the project but is also given the opportunity to learn something new every time.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

Learning something new every day. In a lot of jobs, you kind of settle into a routine 8-5 position doing the same thing every day. We repeat a lot of things here, but everything that gets repeated is customized to someone’s needs. There’s always a chance to learn something new. Even through repetition, we can use that previous experience to ultimately become a better architect.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

I have a few.

First, Olson Kundig by Jim Olson & Tom Kundig. I enjoy the level of detail that they input into all of their projects. They have an uncanny ability to look at something that’s often designed the same way and turn it over on its head in a way that’s interesting, yet simple.

I also respect MacKay Lyons-Sweetapple Architects Limited. Brian Mackay Lyons has an interesting way of looking at landscape and at how space interacts with nature and connect it to what a client is looking for. That’s not always seen in architecture. Most of his work is local to where he’s from but it’s so well developed that he’s established a name for himself worldwide.

Allied Works is the third one, they have a unique ability to define spaces. They often choose a really untraditional material palette that interacts well with whatever the space is intended for. They do it in such a manner that it doesn’t take away from the actual space, rather it’s supplemental to how it functions, which I think is really important in architecture.

Q: What’s your design process like?

Having a background in environmental design, I tend to look heavily at the site to begin with. The characteristics of the site help define the space for me. It’s kind of a trickle down method from there. I rely a lot on client feedback and intentions, meshing those two together into something schematic. From there I just continue to refine the project.

Q: What’s something you’re proud of?

I guess this a multi-faceted question. I’m proud of where I came from. I’m a “New Yorker” and I carry that with myself. One of the first things I do when I introduce myself is say I’m from New York. I think it sums up a lot of aspects about me.

I’m proud of the decisions that I’ve made as a young adult to get me to where I am today. What I mean by that is my decision to move out west with no real family out here and my decision to pursue architecture has ultimately helped me follow my aspirations.

Staff Spotlight: Daniel Holbrook...

Q: Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, about an hour outside of Philadelphia. My parents still live there, as well as my sister and her two kids. Lancaster is a small city, but has a very vibrant downtown. I always knew I wanted to live in a city.

Q: Where did you go to school?

I went to college at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg Va which is in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains.  Blacksburg is very rural, the opposite of city life, not at all where I pictured myself studying architecture.  However, I fell in love with the campus, the surrounding mountains and the great architecture school.

Q: Who is in your family?

My wife, Mollye, who is a structural engineer.  We have a two year daughter together named Ellis.

I also have an older sister and younger brother whom I’m very close with, as well as my parents—all in Pennsylvania.

My sister is a school teacher and administrator. My mom owns and runs her own women’s apparel store specializing in handmade purses.  My father has spent 30+ years in plastics and manufacturing.

My brother also studied architecture at Virginia Tech, but with more of a focus on furniture design. We overlapped for one year in design school.  He’s now working for a cabinetry shop that designs and manufactures casework, as well running a small woodworking business called Hambone Philadelphia. He manufactures small wooden objects, like cutting boards, desk organizers and candle holders.  I have one of his desk organizers on my desk in the office.

Q: When did you first develop an interest in architecture?

Like a lot of architects, I was obsessed with legos as a kid. Whether it was legos or tree forts, I loved to build  things. I always enjoyed art classes and really liked drawing. My mom told me I should be an architect, and since I always listen to my mom, here we are! It was a profession that melded all my interests together and I decided, in high school, to pursue it as major in college and then a career. It’s somewhat terrifying to think that my “highschool self” made such a substantial decision!

Q: What kinds of projects do you most enjoy working on?

I like small ones that have a “jewelry-box” quality; ones with intricate details but not a massive amount of square footage to coordinate..  Residential projects are a lot of fun, I really like working closely with clients to design a house that elevates and simplifies the way they live.

Q: How long have you worked at FA?

It will be five years in September.

Q: What makes our office unique?

Our office is very collaborative. There is a general sense that we get to the best place by talking to each other and relying on each other’s expertise’ rather than one person taking ownership over an idea or project. There’s also a total lack of ego in the office which comes from the top down. It really causes us to look at a design or a project and decide what’s best for it, rather than what each individual is trying to achieve through it.

Q: What’s your favorite part about coming to work?

Well, I get to bike to work, which I really like. But day in and day out, the people at Feldman are the best part about coming to work. I feel very fortunate that I get to work with such a smart, talented group of designers.

Q: Do you think you could live abroad in another country? Where would you choose to go?

100%. I almost burned my return ticket from Copenhagen when I was there a  few years ago. Copenhagen is an unbelievably humane and livable city with lots of families and kids.

Q: Do you have a professional role model?

My Grandfather, Father and Mother all started their own small businesses. Each of them worked incredibly hard to build something from the ground up.  My Grandfather started his own accounting firm, My Mother owns her own retail store and my Father ran a manufacturing company for most of my childhood. Very different ventures, but their individual work ethic and drive to do things right has always been my professional compass.

Q: What’s your design process like?

Iterative. I typically work through a design problem to the point of frustration and then walk away.

I take calculated breaks to finally get comfortable with a solution. Often I’ll find solutions to a design problem while doing something unrelated, like cooking or running.  Walking away and coming back to the design with a clear head is crucial for my individual process.  Often my first reaction to a design problem ends up being the right one, but not always, so it’s imperative for me to work through multiple failures to test that initial reaction to a design problem.

Q: What are your opinions on robots?

I’m a little scared of them to be quite honest. Most movies about robots do NOT end well…

That being said, I did see a video recently of a robot framing a house and that seems really exciting.  Not totally sure how I feel about giving robots nail guns though…

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