Third Thursday February 2017: Matt Hutchinson of PATHarc...

By Katie Paolano

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Licensed architect and gifted fabricator, Matt Hutchinson of PATH, brought his technical expertise and skilled hands to the Feldman studio in February 2017. A one-man-show, PATH is a design and fabrication studio in which Matt focuses on the synthesis of both hand-crafted and machine-made works. In his presentation, Matt noted that materials come together all around us, all the time—in furniture, in everyday products, in the spaces surrounding us—and we commonly experience the hybrid of two different materials fused as one.

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Matt demonstrates this solidarity along with the overlap of digital and hand craft in his VICE Table (shown below) in which the wood surface smoothly transitions into the cast aluminum tray. We were particularly fascinated by his careful attention to the idiosyncrasies and limitations of different materials—how certain woods tend to split and break, whereas aluminum shrinks during the cooling process.

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On the other hand, we at Feldman were all riveted on Matt’s experiments involving two parts of a single material connected by a joint. He created different versions of node connections—able to accommodate round tube, round solid, square tube, and wood dowels. The stool below exemplifies such junction with 3D printed stainless nodes fusing stainless tube struts.

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Matt closed discussion, stressing the paramount importance of experience followed closely by failure, advising Feldman designers not to expect any project to go exactly as planned the first (or even third) try. He claims to still fail all the time, but by the looks of his work however, it appears as though Matt has acquired more than skill, seamlessly creating custom furniture pieces, lamps, chandeliers and other installations to near perfection.

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If we’re lucky enough, maybe we’ll score a Matt Hutchinson custom piece to showcase in one of our future projects!

Thanks for stopping by, Matt!

Check out Matt’s work at http://patharc.com/info

Third Thursday July 2016: Oxgut...

When you hear the name Oxgut, images of beautifully crafted, resourceful designs might not immediately come to mind. However, that is exactly what the Oakland-based startup is known for, as we learned during their visit to the Feldman office in July 2016.

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The unusual name, a nod to the first fire hose made in Ancient Greece, is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the materials from which LauraLe Wunsch produces her enterprising creations. Wunsch salvages “retired” California fire hoses deemed unsafe and re-purposes them into products as practical as they are aesthetically compelling: floor mats, industrial loungers, hammocks, tote bags, and most recently a firewood carrier.

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LauraLe realized the problematic reality of sending the non-biodegradable material to landfills at the end of their careers and believed in their potential to live up to high end design. The hoses, not only striking in hue and texture, each have distinctive markings and history the designer knew deserved to be honored. As if the Oxgut offerings weren’t an enticing enough concept, a portion of the Kickstarter-funded brand’s profits go directly to The Children’s Burn Foundation. Suffice to say; Wunsch left the FA team feeling both inspired, and eager to find their own ways to re-purpose unconventional materials into beautiful, useful creations.

 

Shop the products and find out more about the one-of-a-kind designs at https://www.oxgut.com/

 

-Jacqueline Wray

Third Thursday June 2016: Steffen Kuehr...

We recently had the pleasure of welcoming Sonoma-USA’s Steffen Kuehr into the office for this month’s Third Thursday presentation.  In addition to being married to our very own Leila, Steffen works to repurpose the materials discarded by local businesses and individuals in Sonoma County, fashioning their fabrics into singular new products, such as tote bags and cases for iPads.  Sonoma-USA diverts materials from landfills, designs unique products inspired by the resources at hand, and delivers the end results back into the local community.  Armed with extensive knowledge about the alarming facts concerning waste production and management in the United States, Steffen encouraged us to ”rethink waste.”  He left us both inspired by his use of design as a tool to respect and restore our natural environment and dreaming of new office messenger bags…sonomamracewaymessenger01

You can read more about Sonoma-USA’s mission and process here: http://www.sonoma-usa.com/

Third Thursday May 2016: Charles Debbas...

An architect and an academic, Charles Debbas visited us in May 2016 to share a wide variety of images and projects from his successful and varied career.  From the earliest project he shared, a flower shop in Berkeley, to the child care centers and preschool he designed for a community in Zimbabwe, to his forays into product design, each project he shared assumed its own identity, clearly catered to the client at hand.  Yet, the driving principals behind his work – a belief in the strength of simplicity, a delight in shaping the spatial experience of users, and a commitment to creating designs that activate all human senses – stood out as common across the board.  We are grateful that Charles, who has been an architect in Berkeley since 1989 and teaches at the University when not working in the studio, took some time out of his busy schedule to share his story with us.

Flower Shop, Berkeley CA

Flower Shop, Berkeley CA

Giza Museum Egypt 2002

Giza Museum, Egypt, 2002

Child Care Centers Pre-Schools Zimbabwe 2006

Child Care Centers/Pre-Schools, Zimbabwe, 2006

Ergopen

Ergopen

 

Third Thursday April 2016: LC Studio Tutto...

In April, we had the pleasure of welcoming the two artists behind LC Studio Tutto, Sofia Lacin and Hennessey Chrisophel, into the office to speak about their large-scale public art projects.  Members of the FA team enjoyed taking a break from comparing different shades of gray to learn about projects whose colors run the gamut of the rainbow.  While LC Studio Tutto’s murals in tunnels, under freeways, and on the sides of silos were strikingly different from FA’s own projects in many ways, we were pleased to recognize a few shared core tenants: a careful consideration of site and integration, an attention to each client’s individual needs, and the use of natural light as a dynamic design element.   Most notably, in LC Studio Tutto’s “Same Sun” project, three metal letters perched on top of a large water tank cast shadows onto its painted side below, their shadows shifting over the course of the day and throughout the year.  Once each year, on the summer solstice, the shadow letters align with painted ones to spell out the phrase, “Sol Omnibus Lucet,” or “The Sun Shines Upon Us All.”

We are grateful for Sofia and Hennessey’s insights into the creative design process and the fantastic work it produces, as well as the meaningful discussion about collaboration and process that they struck up after sharing their portfolio.

Bright Underbelly

Bright Underbelly

Contagious Color

Contagious Color

Same Sun

Same Sun

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Sofia Lacin and Hennessey Christophel

Third Thursday March 2016: Christian Rodatus...

In addition to being a good friend of Feldman’s Ahlam Reiley, Christian Rodatus is the Executive Vice President of Enlighted, a company providing the technology to make smart sensors, networked lighting systems, and the Internet of Things viable options for commercial buildings.  Forward-thinking and continually developing, Enlighten’s tools provide information about the activity in a building at given time and harness that information to enhance the experience of the building’s users.  For example, sensors detect daylight and dim lights to reduce energy, or analyze the current temperature to scale back on heating or cooling.  Christian’s presentation made clear the profound implications this technology has for the reduction of energy and resource consumption in large, commercial buildings, and it was exciting to learn how buildings are becoming increasingly responsive to their users.

Rows of office workers working on computers with data streaming

PC: Getty Images/Ikon Images

 

 

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