Third Thursday July 2016: Oxgut...

When you hear the name Oxgut, images of beautifully crafted, resourceful designs might not immediately come to mind. However, that is exactly what the Oakland-based startup is known for, as we learned during their visit to the Feldman office in July 2016.

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The unusual name, a nod to the first fire hose made in Ancient Greece, is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the materials from which LauraLe Wunsch produces her enterprising creations. Wunsch salvages “retired” California fire hoses deemed unsafe and re-purposes them into products as practical as they are aesthetically compelling: floor mats, industrial loungers, hammocks, tote bags, and most recently a firewood carrier.

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LauraLe realized the problematic reality of sending the non-biodegradable material to landfills at the end of their careers and believed in their potential to live up to high end design. The hoses, not only striking in hue and texture, each have distinctive markings and history the designer knew deserved to be honored. As if the Oxgut offerings weren’t an enticing enough concept, a portion of the Kickstarter-funded brand’s profits go directly to The Children’s Burn Foundation. Suffice to say; Wunsch left the FA team feeling both inspired, and eager to find their own ways to re-purpose unconventional materials into beautiful, useful creations.

 

Shop the products and find out more about the one-of-a-kind designs at https://www.oxgut.com/

 

-Jacqueline Wray

Expertise in our Backyard: William Stout Architectural Books...

Just around the corner from our office, on a quiet stretch of Montgomery Street lined by brick facades and a procession of leafy trees, William Stout Architectural Books has offered a quiet refuge and resources to the neighborhood for twenty years.  With over 20,000 American and international titles in the fields of architecture, art, urban planning, graphic and industrial design, furniture design, interior design, and landscape architecture, the discreet bookstore has become both a neighborhood staple and tourist destination.
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Bill Stout, the store’s eponymous founder, began as an architect and still “lives, eats, breaths design and architecture,” according to Carolina, an expert in design publications and a store employee.   Over thirty years ago, Bill began bringing architectural books back from Europe for friends, and eventually turned the hobby into the business that it is today, which includes a publishing company for talented architects with little exposure.  Bill’s passion for design has attracted equally passionate employees; Carolina comes from a family of designers and printers, and she studied Graphic Design in college.

Her colleague, Ian, used to practice design fulltime, and before becoming an employee at William Stout, he was a customer.  Indeed, many of the store’s customers are professionals in the industry who come to William Stout in search of inspiration or insight.  Ian describes them as “people who use the books for function rather than leisure,” and says that the comment he hears the most often is “I wish I had more time!”  Not only do customers wish for more time to pour over the many volumes on the crowded shelves lining the stores walls and creating aisles in the center of the crowded space, but they are also often required to make a return visit to tap the considerable knowledge of the store’s employees like Ian and Carolina.  William Stout has become a networking tool, or “directory,” the pair says, and they are often asked to recommend professionals as resources or consultants for their customers.   As it grew to become a cultural hub, the store’s clientele expanded to include tourists, as well.  “It’s a destination,” Carolina explains.  “You come here just like you would go to the MOMA.”

While the clientele has changed over the decades, the passion behind the business and the bones of the operation have remained true to their original forms.  Even the rise in digital publishing has done little to curb the store’s success.  Carolina believes that they experience of thumbing through a book, its “tactility” and “intimacy,” is too different from browsing a publication online for the two media to be in competition.

With a treasure trove of monographs on talented architects, complete with stunning images and well-honed text, it is challenging for a publication to stand out on the shelf and in the mind of the reader.  According to the pros at William Stout, though, there are a few qualities that make a publication compelling.  “Type is essential,” says Ian, whose own favorite book in the collection, Manuals 1: Design and Identity Guidelines, explores examples of graphic design from companies and institutions who capitalized on the science behind what makes a certain font, layout, or color scheme more compelling.  Monographs published in an architect’s prime, or even as promotional material for newer firms, can be just as successful as books published at the end of an architect’s career.  “Both have great energy” explains Carolina, “It’s the enthusiasm and confidence of the younger architects versus the experience and wisdom of the more accomplished ones.”  She finds herself drawn to collections that exhibit a “formidable character,” identifying Louis Kahn as engaging individual who maintained the same level as artistry in words as he did in his designs; if the architect’s a compelling person, his or her book will be, too.

At Feldman Architecture, we feel lucky to have such a rich resource just around the corner, available for insight or inspiration on any day of the week.  It is clear that Bill Stout’s passion for the intersection of design and books both casts a legacy that will remain meaningful for decades to come and extends to his employees.  As I step back across the shop’s threshold and into the sunshine of Montgomery Street, I catch Carolina pulling a definitive guide to graphic design off of the shelf for a customer at the front of the store.   Flipping through its pages, slowing to show its glossy images to the woman at her side, she smiles.  “This is kind of like the Bible,” she says.

-Abigail Bliss

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Soberanes Fire Near Big Sur...

This past weekend, Steven and I visited a few signature Feldman projects not far from the massive forest fires that hit Big Sur recently. As helicopters circled overhead, we became increasingly alarmed by the staggering severity of the crisis, which affected nearby areas but not any Feldman projects themselves. The affected area has grown to approximately 15,000 acres and while there are 1,500 firefighters working to mitigate the situation, containment currently stands at only at 5%. So far, no Feldman projects are at risk, but there’s been a call for voluntary evacuation of homes in the area. Two of our clients are full-time residents and are hanging in there, though their bags are packed for a quick exit should things get worse. It’s a sobering reminder about the power of nature, and the need to respect it. To stay up to date on developments, head over to http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents .

– Jonathan

 

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View from House Ocho driveway

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View from House Ocho driveway

View from near the Hacienda

View from the Hacienda

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View South from Hacienda lawn

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View from Hacienda

View From Chemisal

View from Chemisal

 

View from Penon Peak Trail

View from Penon Peak Trail

View From Long Ridge Trail

View From Long Ridge Trail

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Once a Cook, Always a Craftsman: Evan Shively on Materiality...

Evan Shively takes the day at a jog.  The handful of employees at Aborica, his mill and showroom in the rolling hills of Marshall, California, try to keep pace, running from the compound’s wood mill to its showroom and through the stacks of wood piled by the side of its uneven dirt driveway, hardhats clutched to their heads.  They gesticulate wildly to each other – higher, lower, stop, and start – inaudible over the noise of the machines creating slabs from reclaimed wood Evan has gathered from throughout the area.  Their heavy machinery careens around corners, kicking up dust in its wake and coating the yellow wildflowers along the barn in a fine powder.  If there’s a sense of urgency to this June afternoon, it’s because Evan’s wood salvage business is high demand.

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Today, Evan and his team are sawing second growth Redwood for a new supermarket south of the City.  Seven Redwood trees were taken from the site of the supermarket and, after months of drawings and revisions from the client, Evan is sawing them into slabs according to the provided specs before sending them on to the fabricator, enabling them to inhabit their old home in a new way.

One employee, Chris, carefully positions the wooden slabs on the machine used to saw and trim their edges.  Chris is new to the Pettibone machine required to move the slabs, and Evan pushes and shoves a piece of the redwood to position it correctly, wiggling the wood and his hips to place it in precisely the right spot.  At times, the wood, too, appears to be dancing, animated by the machine that props it up on one edge and then the other.  Maneuvering the long slabs and setting them down at just the right angle requires a certain dexterity from the heavy machinery and its driver, and Evan eventually hops up in the driver seat, a measuring tape marked with a Hello-Kitty sticker hanging out of his pocket, to help Chris steer the slabs into place.  “It’s a careful choreography,” he calls over his shoulder.  “It’s like ballet.”

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The business of sawing wood, while often branded as based more on strength than on grace, is a careful craft requiring extreme precision and a willingness to linger in the creative process.  And, like any artist, Evan draws inspiration from his materials in their original form and encourages his clients to do the same.  “Being in the presence of the wood is going to give him clarity,” he says of one client lacking design direction.  “He’ll think of the boundless ways he could accomplish his goal, rather than what would be necessary to get him there.”

For Evan, each piece of wood has a personality and a past, and deserves a project that will celebrate both.  As we make our way through Aborica’s barn, removed from the din of the machines down the hill, and a cat scurries from one shaded corner to the next, Evan stops at specific slabs, pointing them out in their stacks as individuals.  “This is one of the most outrageously beautiful things in the shop.  It’s like a natural Noguchi,” he says in front of one Walnut slab.  At a lovely Elm one that has yet to be put to good use, he expresses his genuine disappointment that it hasn’t found a good home.

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Evan runs back to his office, a shaded and cool room, where the halves of a pitted slice of trunk lie flat on the floor in the form of two arched seats and sketches are strewn across the slab propped up as a desk.  He picks up the phone and dials a friend.

“Happy birthday!” He says when the friend answers. “What you do want me to cook? And, remember we’re not beholden to finger food.”

In his former career, Evan was a successful chef and still throws dinner parties and cooks for friends in the professionally-equipped kitchen of his home.  For his friend’s birthday dinner, he decides to consult the fish market of his choice and ends up settling on 3 lbs of shrimp and 5 lbs of squid, and, after asking if there is “anything else impossibly delicious” at the market that day, decides to “bust a little ceviche.”  The ingredients at hand are driving the meal.

Like working with wood, cooking is predicated on natural materials, Evan explains, and the sweet spot sits at the intersection of resources and design.  Both of the crafts he has turned into professions begin with and hinge on the materials that inspire them.  “You don’t decide to make an arugula salad and then go about making the arugula,” he says. “You have the arugula and think, ‘This would make a really delicious salad.’”  Evan, like us at Feldman, believes that materiality is never an afterthought.

-Abigail Bliss

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Summer 2016 Newsletter...

Greetings from San Francisco, where summer is in full swing!  Here at Feldman Architecture, the start of the season has ushered in fresh faces and new projects.  The many exciting developments include the kickoff of our first construction project in Los Angeles, a remodel in the Hollywood Hills, and the opportunity to design our first restaurant: a “fast casual” establishment featuring South Indian cuisine in Oakland’s thriving Uptown district.

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As we continue to expand our repertoire, looking forward to the projects on the horizon, we also take great pleasure in looking back at recently completed projects newly captured in photos and in print.  We are delighted to share that Ranch O|H, a modern take on the traditional ranch home located in the scenic Santa Lucia mountains, was featured in the latest issue of Dwell Magazine (see above).  The article, “A Meadow with Amenities,” showcases the design’s blend of indoor and outdoor living spaces, as well as its subtle integration of modern technology and materials into a classic typology.

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We took advantage of the season’s sunny skies to photograph three recently completed projects and are excited to share some sneak peeks with you!  Joe Fletcher expertly photographed Healdsburg 1, where the great room transforms into an outdoor pavilion with sweeping, continuous views of the village below (see above).  Joe also photographed Noe Valley 2, an urban remodel that brought an abundance of natural light, a neat floor plan, and strong connection to the outdoors to a family home in San Francisco.  Finally, Noe Valley 3’s efficient design and carefully selected materials enable the home to achieve LEED Platinum certification, and its innovative use of light, both natural and artificial, was captured by the talented Paul Dyer (see below).  We are lucky to collaborate with Paul and Joe, who continue to showcase our projects’ “good sides” time and time again.

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Earlier this spring, the office took a fieldtrip north of the city to visit one recently completed project and one in the midst of its finishing touches.  The trip gave the staff a chance to see the product of our colleagues’ hard work up close and in person.  We took a quick detour to visit Evan Shively’s showroom and wood mill in Marshall, where Evan transforms wood salvaged from landfills and demo sites into works of art, savoring the creative process and its collaborative nature along the way.  Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post on Evan’s operation later this month!

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The FA team also hopped over to the Presidio to blow off some steam at the House of Air.  While some staff members enjoyed stringing together complex bouncing routines, others took to the dodgeball court, where they found themselves embroiled in a game of Kids vs. Adults.  Those are hard games to win, right, Matt Lindsay?

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We’d like to issue a warm welcome to Evan McCurdy, who has returned to FA full-time after his internship with us last summer, and Liza Karimova, a current architecture student at UC Berkeley who is joining us as a summer intern.  We are also happy to announce that our Feldman families have grown.   In early April, Daniel and Mollye Holbrook welcomed their daughter Ellis Anne Holbrook to the world!  A big congratulations to the proud parents and their families, and best wishes to baby Ellis, who won our hearts during her first office visit and, more importantly, the affection of Chris’ dog Briar.

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To stay up to date on all Feldman Architecture news, be sure to check out our staff blog, where the most recent entry details Anjali’s trip to Vancouver, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Instagram!

Until next time,
Feldman Architecture

 

Vancouver in 3 Days: Where to Go, How to Get There, and What to Eat as an Architect in the City...

After five years since our move to the US, we decided it was high time that we expand our travels beyond the borders of the country. The province of British Columbia has always held a strong allure to us for its stunning landscapes and fascinating culture. So I was thrilled when the better half planned a surprise getaway to Vancouver for my birthday.  Four days felt awfully inadequate but we decided to roll with it. A short early morning flight transported us to a very warm sultry Vancouver. The airport with its wonderful First Nation sculptures and totem poles hinted at the rich history of British Columbia. A large ‘living wall’ affirmed Vancouver’s reputation for being one of the early adopters of environmental sustainability. The Skytrain took us through the suburbia to a very urban jungle that is Downtown Vancouver. We Airbnb’ed at a condo right in the heart of Gastown, one of the historic neighborhoods that is a surreal mix of high-rise buildings and cobbled maple tree-lined streets with vintage streetlights and a historic steam clock to boot!

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Gastown

We realized immediately that this was a city where public transportation was supreme. The ‘waterfront-town’ is densely populated with a small footprint of 44 sq. miles. Across the peninsula is North Vancouver, accessible by the sea-bus and by road. We got ourselves travel passes and set out to explore our hood, Gastown by foot. We were within walking distance to the famous 17mile SeaWall that forms the waterfront wrapping around the city. One could see the snow-capped tips of the Grouse Mountain in the distance. The SeaWall starts at Canada Place – known for its iconic Sails of Light. Right next to it is the impressive new convention center – a majestic waterfront development with a six-acre living roof, the largest in North America in a non-industrial context. We hopped on a bus that took us to the famous Stanley Park. Unlike the Golden Gate Park which is fairly introverted and embedded in the heart of San Francisco, Stanley Park fingers out from the city, thus allowing views of Vancouver that change as one walks the wall. We took trails into the park at different points alternating between dense wild shaded vegetation to emerge again at the perimeter wall delighting in a different view of the city. We exited the park and headed to our pad by bus, exhausted but excited about our dinner plans. We had reservations at the popular Forage known for it’s locally-sourced innovative menu.  It did not disappoint my vegetarian palette. We strolled back home taking in the expanses of open urban spaces between the dense high rise condos. The lights had started coming on and the city glowed, draped by the ever-present shimmering water. This was a truly urban oasis where people lived outdoors than in their cramped condos. The city felt safe.

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From Sea Wall

Stanley Park

On day two, we walked to  Medina Cafe, a Mediterranean restaurant with a solid reputation for unique flavors and the best Belgian waffles in the city. We beat the long queues and got ourselves a table within the hour. Pleased with brunch, we set forth to take the sea bus to North Vancouver. We landed at Vancouver’s carnival style farmer’s market at the Lonsdale Quay – a visual treat with its fresh produce and local vibe.

Lonsdale Quay

We proceeded to our next destination- the Lynn Canyon public park with its suspension bridge and miles of hiking trails. Per our host’s recommendation, we chose Lynn Canyon over the more popular touristy Capillano Suspension Bridge park. We hiked for a few hours and then took a taxi to the foothills of the Grouse mountain. The Grouse mountain is accessible only by a gondola skyride that takes you over the forest to the a chalet on top. An alternative is the daunting but highly popular Grouse Grind hike aka ‘Mother Nature’s Stairmaster’ involving 2800 odd steps through dense forest. We took the gondola — let’s say only because we were out of time. Ahem. The chalet at the top houses a few restaurants and a theater. A short hike took us to our first sighting of two rescued grizzlies that live there. They seemed very indifferent to our presence. We walked around the chalet to capture the panoramic vistas of the city across. A bus, a sea-bus and a train took us back into the city within the hour. Soon we headed out for our Italian night — to Lupo, a Vancouver icon in the entertainment district of Yaletown. Located in a charming heritage house with interconnected rooms, the menu was limited but inspired. We concluded a fabulous birthday dinner with a creme brûlée that was to die for. We walked home. The streets and landmarks were beginning to feel familiar…

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Day three – we walked a different section of the SeaWall to board an aquabus that took us to Granville Island- an old industrial hub that has been revived by local artists who set up their workshops in these factories. Weekends draw large crowds from the city. The tiny peninsula is animated with live music and fresh food at the large public market, accompanied by shopping unique finds at the artist workshops and boutiques. We picked up a few tchotkches and set forth to the piece-de-resistance of the day, the Museum of Anthropology by the Canadian modernist, Arthur Erickson. The museum is set in the large lush campus grounds of the University of British Columbia. The campus boasts of a good number of modern buildings but the museum was the jewel in the crown. The collection focuses on artefacts of the First Nation, the Canadian Aboriginals of the NorthWest Coast, though it has an extensive ethnographic collection of cultures from around the world. The strikingly modern building cleverly reinterprets the post-and-beam architecture of the First Nation people in concrete. Staggered concrete frames are spanned by vaulted skylights that filter natural light strategically into the museum spaces. The varying heights of the vaults along with a gentle slope in the floor, gradually expands the volume of the central exhibit area. The space culminates in a frameless glass wall that seamlessly merges into the outside. The outdoor landscape is marked by a reflecting pool and a few reconstructed Haida houses with signature totem poles acting as coordinates.  We were unable to do justice to the vast collection housed in the museum but it was really the architecture that was our main focus. It inspired, and humbled, leaving us in a contemplative state of mind. Like all good museums, the MoA has a great gift shop. We picked up some wonderful prints of modern reinterpretation of First Nation art by local artists.

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The mythology of the First Nation and their survival despite colonization and repeated pressures to assimilate, runs strong. At the MoA, we had discovered the works of Bill Reid, a true Renaissance man who drew from his Haida roots as a sculptor, carver, goldsmith and artist. Reid was one of the pivotal figures that championed the cause of the First Nation people and gave their art legitimacy in modern history. Born to a mother who was a Haida, Bill immersed himself in their culture and became one of the leading artists of his time. We knew we had to make time to visit the Bill Reid Gallery set right in Downtown Vancouver. The next day, we chose to skip the larger Vancouver Art Gallery and visit this tiny gem instead. Tucked away in the bustling downtown neighborhood, this building though surrounded by high-rises doesn’t get dwarfed. Well-proportioned and thoughtfully detailed, the gallery is carefully curated with permanent exhibits by Bill and a few by his protégés. The silver and gold jewelry display by Reid are spectacular. The gift shop offers a varied collection of original aboriginal art. We couldn’t be happier with our decision to visit here on our last day. It felt like an appropriate homage to conclude our first venture into British Columbia.

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In a little over three days, we had gained some insights into the story of the First Nation people and into the cosmopolitan urban pulse of Vancouver, it’s most populous and popular city today. As someone born and raised in India, there was a comfortable familiarity with Vancouver’s British influences- be it describing temperature in degree Celsius, distances in kilometers or getting a ‘bill’ at the end of a meal 😉 We explored the nightlife on our last night. No vacation of ours is quite complete without a sampling of the local music scene. Gastown was perfect for our quest. We walked the streets exploring a few bars and clubs. We settled on one which had a live jazz session. It was evidently a neighborhood haunt as the regulars seemed to know each other. It wasn’t touristy. We had lucked out with warm sunny days for our entire vacation concluding with a smattering of rain as we made our exit. This was a fun trip- a teaser that had whetted our appetite for more. We knew we would be back…soon. – Anjali

Jazz Bar

Third Thursday June 2016: Steffen Kuehr...

We recently had the pleasure of welcoming Sonoma-USA’s Steffen Kuehr into the office for this month’s Third Thursday presentation.  In addition to being married to our very own Leila, Steffen works to repurpose the materials discarded by local businesses and individuals in Sonoma County, fashioning their fabrics into singular new products, such as tote bags and cases for iPads.  Sonoma-USA diverts materials from landfills, designs unique products inspired by the resources at hand, and delivers the end results back into the local community.  Armed with extensive knowledge about the alarming facts concerning waste production and management in the United States, Steffen encouraged us to ”rethink waste.”  He left us both inspired by his use of design as a tool to respect and restore our natural environment and dreaming of new office messenger bags…sonomamracewaymessenger01

You can read more about Sonoma-USA’s mission and process here: http://www.sonoma-usa.com/

Third Thursday May 2016: Charles Debbas...

An architect and an academic, Charles Debbas visited us in May 2016 to share a wide variety of images and projects from his successful and varied career.  From the earliest project he shared, a flower shop in Berkeley, to the child care centers and preschool he designed for a community in Zimbabwe, to his forays into product design, each project he shared assumed its own identity, clearly catered to the client at hand.  Yet, the driving principals behind his work – a belief in the strength of simplicity, a delight in shaping the spatial experience of users, and a commitment to creating designs that activate all human senses – stood out as common across the board.  We are grateful that Charles, who has been an architect in Berkeley since 1989 and teaches at the University when not working in the studio, took some time out of his busy schedule to share his story with us.

Flower Shop, Berkeley CA

Flower Shop, Berkeley CA

Giza Museum Egypt 2002

Giza Museum, Egypt, 2002

Child Care Centers Pre-Schools Zimbabwe 2006

Child Care Centers/Pre-Schools, Zimbabwe, 2006

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Catching up with the Client: SF Loft...

“Don’t do what’s hip.  Do what’s you,” advised one of the owners of a recently renovated SoMa loft as he stood in his new kitchen.  An executive coach to early age start-ups, he and his wife, an attorney, use the loft as an urban pied-a-terre after downsizing from Silicon Valley, splitting their time between the city and their weekend wine country home.

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Their new loft strikes a balance between modern minimalism and the kitsch of the accoutrements they’ve collected over years of travel.  It features both the crispness of uninterrupted lines in its casework and the curves of conch shells gifted from relatives, as well as an all-white palette integrated with coins of color.  These complimentary design elements are a result of extensive collaboration between the architects and the owners, and prove that strong relationships are the foundation for good design.

At the core of the collaborative design process was Steven Stept, who designed the project with his previous partner Irit Axelrod and saw it through construction at Feldman Architecture.

“Steven and I are a lot alike,” explained the start-ups coach, who situated himself at the heart of the design discussion by managing the project with the help of a superintendent in lieu of hiring a general contractor.  “We are focused and unafraid to disagree.  I can tell if something is off by an inch from 50 feet away.  It comes down to attention to detail, and Steven is absolutely zealous about that.”

Indeed, the project’s success as a coherent whole is built from thoughtful details, from a slight lift in counter height to accommodate the stature of one of the clients, to a discreet corner designed specifically with the needs of the couple’s cat in mind.

“When you’re anticipating a vision,” explained the attorney, “you see the pieces of the design, but you can’t know the usefulness of their whole until you live in it. The design functions exactly as we had intended it.”

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When the couple, first encountered the space, they were attracted to its “warehouse vibe,” reminiscent of the 1924 building’s previous stint as a printing business.  The loft’s high ceilings and abundance of concrete kept it from being a “cookie-cutter space,” but its maple floor was worn and warped, and a lack of storage would leave personal belongings exposed and the space cluttered with trinkets.  With an initial vision centered on simplicity, balance, and symmetry, the couple and their design team set out to bring the space to its full potential.

To do so, Axelrod + Stept Architects crafted a precise plan to integrate the concrete structure into a fluid design, where carefully orchestrated spaces behind a horizontal sliding door would offer privacy for the bedroom, master bath, and laundry.  The successful execution of their design incorporated carefully selected products and materials, proving the clients’ and designers’ commitment to design excellence from design vision to reality.  The end result was a striking design, based on precision and expertly executed.

The remodel pulled one of the long, narrow apartment’s walls back from its previously angled position, allowing natural light from the space’s largest window to wash down the entire length of the apartment.  The new wall is covered in sleek custom casework, whose elongated lines accentuate the loft’s length and flow into the kitchen and whose bright white offers a striking contrast to the dark wood of the loft’s floor.*  Across from the casework, horizontal slatted aluminum and glass sliding doors from the Italian designer Adielle hide the master suite and a powder room when closed, creating defined spaces within a coherent whole.  When open, the doors allow one space to flow into another, adding a sense of agility to a home characterized by rigid lines.  So, too, an Ecro-USA track fixture with LED lights running the length of the corridor, splashing spotlights onto the doors and casework, can be adjusted for both intensity and angle.  Throughout the apartment, the design team devoted careful thought to the integration of the space’s interior design and lighting, tapping into the expertise of local lighting designer Tali Ariely.**

With a new laundry and utility room, a guest Murphy bed that recedes into the casework, and extensive storage, the space remains free from clutter, and its sight lines stretch uninterrupted from one end of the apartment to the other.

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“The casework is a wonderful looking piece of architecture,” commented one of the clients. “But, more importantly, the space just became more usable.”

Just as the architects brought a design centered on white casework and dark floors and the clients added animation and dimension through souvenirs and select art, the character of the neighborhood had a role in shaping the loft’s design.  Just a few blocks from South Park, the loft is immersed in the energy of its growing neighborhood.  New office buildings stretch towards the sky, and at street level lines for hole-in-the-wall lunch destinations stretch around the block.  The modern aesthetic of the design anticipated the new life the past few years has brought to the neighborhood.  Yet, while it reflects the freshness of its environment visually, the loft’s thick envelope keeps the space quiet.  And, just as they find the minimalism of the space as calming rather than cool, the clients find a serenity in the apartment that sets it apart from its busy surroundings.

-Abigail Bliss

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*The corridor casework is a custom linear cabinet by Bartlett Cabinets in Oakland, CA.  The kitchen cabinetry comes from Downsview Cabinets.

** The ultimate lighting design warms the modern loft with surface mounted wall washers from Kreon, recessed linear lighting from XAL, bath wall sconces and pendant fixtures from Vibia, and wall uplight sconces from Leucos.

Spring 2016 Newsletter...

Happy Spring from Feldman Architecture, where the warm(er) weather has brought fresh faces to the FA team, new projects to our firm, up-to-date photos to the website, and extensive progress on job sites across the Bay Area.

In recent news, our Palo Alto Lantern House was featured in the April 2016 edition ofSan Francisco Magazine.  The article, entitled “Venturing Outside the Box: A modern Palo Alto home that rounds out the Edges,” delves into the creative process behind the residence’s design, revealing how a combination of aesthetic preferences and perspectives contributed to the warm modernism of the finished home.  Take a look at photographer Paul Dyer’s images of the house, newly posted on the Feldman website, to find out why it was dubbed The Lantern House (pictured above).  This summer, keep an eye out for the July/August issue of Dwell Magazine for an exclusive feature story about Ranch O|H, a modern retreat in Carmel’s Santa Lucia Preserve!

We are thrilled to share three new projects with you via the ever-growing On the Boards section of our website: Project Miller, an all-family, inspirational nature retreat with a focus on the restorative powers of nature in the heart of the Salinas Valley; Vineyard Haven, a guest cottage in coastal New England; and the Pavilion, a residence perched on a ledge overlooking San Jose (pictured below).  Stay tuned for more FA updates, including new images from our recent photoshoot of a San Franciscan loft, which capture the crisp lines and cool palette of the home (sneak peek below).

We would like to issue a warm welcome to the four newest members of our growing firm, including the talented Leila Bijan, Manli Zarandian, and Heera Basi, as well as Jeff Wheeler, Feldman Architecture’s third Associate (pictured below from left).   We are grateful for the wealth of experience and skills that they bring to the team and excited to collaborate with them on current and future projects.

Adept as they are at the drafting table, our new staff members were no match for Tai’s sons at the pool table.  The M.V.P. of our office excursion to Jillian’s was undoubtedly four-year-old Hayoto, whose knack for sneaking balls from the table brought new meaning to the concept of aggressive play (pictured below).

To learn which new hire wrote their undergraduate thesis on feminism and architecture in the 1960s, check out the new staff’s bios and portraits on Feldman Architecture’s website, and take a peek at our new group portrait, too.  The wonderful Sarah Peet managed to produce a shot that showcases all of our good sides, even if it prominently features a pair of mismatched socks.

Be sure to stay up to date with the latest Feldman Architecture news via our Facebook and Instagram (@feldmanarchitecture), where we’ll continue to post construction photos and project updates.

Until next time,
The team at Feldman Architecture

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